Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 10, 2020, 5:43 am

1
WW!
Most of the fighting of the war took place in the trenches of Europe. Almost 10,000 kilometres of trenches were dug on both sides of the western front, generally around 10-feet deep and 6-feet wide. They accumulated water quickly at the bottom when it rained, turning them into mud baths infested with rodents and insects.

The muddy conditions caused ‘trench foot,' which led to blisters, open sores, fungal infections and eventually gangrene, requiring amputation. One estimate suggests that 20,000 British casualties were caused by trench foot in 1914.

Over the course of the war, wet conditions in the trenches gradually improved due to better drainage and more waterproof footwear, but the weather still made life unbearable for many soldiers, particularly during the harsh winter of 1916-17

2
Colin Gray WW2 New Zealnd Fighter Ace With Nov 11 coming upon us a great read Colin Falkland Gray

Group Captain Colin Falkland Gray, DSO, DFC & Two Bars (9 November 1914 – 1 August 1995) was a Royal Air Force (RAF) officer and the top New Zealand fighter ace of the Second World War.

Born in Christchurch, Gray was accepted into the RAF in 1939 on a short service commission, after two previous attempts failed on medical grounds. He flew with No. 54 Squadron during the Battle of France. His twin brother, who had also joined the RAF and was a bomber pilot, was killed in a flying accident at this time. He flew extensively for the majority of the Battle of Britain and by September 1940, he had shot down 14 enemy aircraft and had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC). He fulfilled a training role for the next few months before returning to offensive operations in early 1941.

Gray commanded No. 616 Squadron on the Channel Front and was awarded a Bar to his DFC before being sent to the Mediterranean theatre of operations to lead No. 64 Squadron. By 1943 he was a wing commander and flew a number of operations in the North African and Italian Campaigns. By the end of the year he had destroyed at least a further 13 enemy aircraft and been awarded the Distinguished Service Order. A return to Europe followed and in September 1944, he commanded a wing supporting the airborne operations of the Battle of Arnhem. He finished the war with a confirmed 27 victories. After the war he held a number of staff and command positions in the RAF before his eventual retirement in 1961. He returned to New Zealand to work for Unilever. He died in 1995 at the age of 80.



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 11, 2020, 5:40 am

One of the World's hopefully,best known days, Remembrance Day
So please at 11:00hr today offer 2 minutes silence to remember and honour those that have served.
Thank you ,
A request, If you meet someone who doesn't know about Remembrance Day offer a brief description to them

1

Remembrance Day (sometimes known informally as Poppy Day owing to the tradition of the remembrance poppy) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Following a tradition inaugurated by individual George V in 1919,[1] the day is also marked by war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November in most countries to recall the end of hostilities of First World War on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month", in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. ("At the 11th hour" refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.[2]

The tradition of Remembrance Day evolved out of Armistice Day. The initial Armistice Day was observed at Buckingham Palace, commencing with individual George V hosting a "Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic"[3] during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning. During the Second World War, many countries changed the name of the holiday. Member states of the Commonwealth of Nations adopted Remembrance Day, while the US chose Veterans Day.

The common British, Canadian, South African, and ANZAC tradition includes a one- or two-minute silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (11:00 am, 11 November), as that marks the time (in the United Kingdom) when the armistice became effective.[citation needed]

The Service of Remembrance in many Commonwealth countries generally includes the sounding of the "Last Post", followed by the period of silence, followed by the sounding of "Reveille" or sometimes just "The Rouse" (often confused for each other), and finished by a recitation of the "Ode of Remembrance". The "Flowers of the Forest", "O Valiant Hearts", "I Vow to Thee, My Country" and "Jerusalem" are often played during the service. Services also include wreaths laid to honour the fallen, a blessing, and national anthems.[5]

The central ritual at cenotaphs throughout the Commonwealth is a stylised night vigil. The Last Post was the common bugle call at the close of the military day, and The Rouse was the first call of the morning. For military purposes, the traditional night vigil over the slain was not just to ensure they were indeed dead and not unconscious or in a coma, but also to guard them from being mutilated or despoiled by the enemy, or dragged off by scavengers. This makes the ritual more than just an act of remembrance but also a pledge to guard the honour of war dead. The act is enhanced by the use of dedicated cenotaphs (literally Greek for "empty tomb") and the laying of wreaths—the traditional means of signalling high honours in ancient Greece and Rome.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 12, 2020, 5:44 am

1

It is estimated that 40 million drivers in the UK forget to where they parked every year. ODD


2

In the 1950's the most visited area in London Britain was not Windsor Castle or The Tower of London
It was the observation deck at Heathrow airport to view incoming and outgoing airplanes


3

To paint an A380 it takes
A Team of 34
6,000 Hours
and 1,100 litres of paint

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 13, 2020, 11:48 am

1

Pithos is the Greek name of a large storage container. The term in English is applied to such containers used among the civilizations that bordered the Mediterranean Sea in the Neolithic, the Bronze Age and the succeeding Iron Age. Pithoi were used for bulk storage, primarily for fluids and grains; they were comparable to the drums, barrels and casks of recent times. The name was different in other languages; for instance, the Hittites used harsi-.

Secondarily, discarded pithoi found other uses. Like the ceramic bathtubs of some periods, the size of a pithos made it a convenient coffin. In Middle Helladic burials in Mycenae and Crete, sometimes the bones of the interred were placed in pithoi. The ancient Iberian culture of El Argar used pithoi for coffins in its B phase (1500-1300 BC).

The external shape and materials were approximately the same: a ceramic jar about as high as a man, a base for standing, sides nearly straight or generously curved, and a large mouth with a lid, sealed for shipping.

Jars of this size could not be handled by individuals, especially when full. Various numbers of handles, or lugs, or some combination thereof, gave a purchase for some sort of harness used in lifting the jar with a crane.

Pithoi were manufactured and exported or imported over the entire Mediterranean. They were used most heavily in the Bronze Age palace economy for storing or shipping wine, olive oil, or various types of vegetable products for distribution to the populace served by the palace administration. Consequently, they became known to the modern public as pithoi when western classical archaeologists adopted the term to mean the jars uncovered by excavation of Minoan palaces on Crete and Mycenaean ones on mainland Greece.

The term has now been adopted into the English language as a general word for a storage jar from any culture. Along with this universality has come a problem of distinguishing the smaller pithoi from other types of pottery. Many ceramics are not any easily classifiable shape. If they were used for transport or storage, they are likely to be called pithoi, even though they are not the size of the palace pithoi, and even though the forms might well have fit other types. Reconciliation of pre-classical pottery types with classical types has long been a problem of classical archaeology.

2

Cygnophobia or kiknophobia is the fear of swans. Swans are highly intelligent and remember who has been kind to them, or not. In 2001, a man in Ireland had his leg broken by a swan when he was trying to provoke it. A group of wild swans is known as a herd, however a group in captivity are called a fleet.
Damn

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 14, 2020, 7:38 am

1
For all you handsome people out there wondering all facts regarding your hair or for those others "the lack of"

Hair-raising facts:

An average scalp has 100,000-150,000 hairs.
Hair is so strong that each hair can withstand the strain of 100 grams (3.5 ounces). An average head of hair could hold 10-15 tons if only the scalp was strong enough!
Human hair grows autonomously, that is each hair is on its own individual cycle. If all our hair were on the same cycle, we would molt!
Hair has the highest rate of mitosis (cell division). An average hair grows 0.3 mm a day and 1 cm per month
There ya go something to tell the Grandkids

2

Forty million years ago, horses first emerged in North America, but after migrating to Asia over the Bering land bridge, horses disappeared from this continent at least 10,000 years ago. So for millennia, Native Americans traveled and hunted on foot, relying on dogs as miniature pack animals.

When Christopher Columbus brought two dozen Andalousian horses on his second voyage to the New World in 1493, he couldn’t have imagined how reintroducing the horse to North America would transform Native American life, especially for the buffalo-hunting Plains Indians, for whom the swift and loyal horse was a marriage made in heaven.
When Columbus and other Spanish explorers arrived in Hispaniola on horseback, the native Taíno of the Caribbean were terrified by what they saw as a half-man, half-beast, says Herman Viola, a curator emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution. “They had never seen a creature that had human beings riding on it.”

As more Native tribes encountered the horse, that initial fear gave way to awe for the animal’s speed and power. With the dog as their closest reference, Indians gave this mythical new creature names like “elk dog,” “sky dog” and “holy dog.”

“The Spanish quickly realized that the last thing they wanted was for Indians to have horses, because that would put them on equal footing,” says Viola, but that’s exactly what happened following the Pueblo Uprising of 1680. After enduring a century of harsh Spanish rule, the otherwise peaceful Pueblo Indians violently drove the Spanish from Santa Fe and captured their prized horses, which they then traded with neighboring tribes.

Horses quickly moved across trade routes to the Navajo, Ute and Apache, then to the Kiowa and Comanche of the southern Plains, and the Shoshone of the Mountain West. By 1700, horses had reached the Nez Perce and Blackfoot of the far Northwest, and traveled eastward to the Lakota, Crow and Cheyenne of the northern Plains. As horses arrived from the west, the first guns were being traded from the east. By the time of the French and Indian War in the 1760s, the armed and mounted Indian warrior was a formidable presence on the Great Plains.
Buffalo are big, strong and fast. Before horses came to the Plains, Native hunters pursued large herds on foot, but it was dangerous, difficult work with low odds of success. One technique was to startle and chase an animal toward a cliff or dropoff called a “buffalo jump.” Once wounded, the buffalo was easier to kill.
“When horses were introduced, the modes of hunting changed,” says Emil Her Many Horses, a curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and a member of the Oglala Lakota nation. “A favorite hunting horse could be trained to ride right into the stampeding buffalo herd.”

For the Plains Indians, the newfound speed and efficiency of hunting on horseback provided an abundance of high-quality meat, hides for tipis and clothing, and rawhide for shields and boxes. With the help of a draggable wooden sledge called a travois, horses could now transport entire villages and their possessions to follow the seasonal hunt.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 15, 2020, 7:47 am

1
South Vietnam (1955–1975)
Communist revolutionary Ho Chi Minh, who declared independence from French Indochina in 1945, captured much of northern Vietnam by the early 1950s and defeated the former colonial power in 1954. The peace talks that followed granted Vietnam independence and split the country into two zones, North Vietnam and South Vietnam, with elections planned for 1956 that would unite them.
The South's anti-communist leader Ngo Dinh Diem refused to hold the reunification elections and the North reacted by starting the bloody 20-year Vietnam War. Despite the involvement of US, Australian and Thai forces, the South was defeated by the Soviet Union and China-backed North, and the two zones were forcibly united in 1976 to create the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

2
Heathrow
Nearly 600 people are extradited back to their countries via Heathrow on various criminal warrants

Lost a bag ? They handle over 40 Million bags a year.
30 miles of conveyors

74,000,000 passengers a year thats 203,000 people a day

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 16, 2020, 7:26 am

1
Heathrow

*200 Passports lost every month inside the airport

*31 Cardiac arrests every year and they are prepared to help

*Busiest international routes to and from Heathrow

2018 / 191New York–JFK 3,192,195Increase 5.2%

Dubai–International 2,333,127Decrease 10.6%

Dublin 1,855,333Increase 2.5%

Amsterdam 1,748,216Increase 0.1%

Hong Kong 1,612,530Increase 2.0



2

Vietnam: January 29 to July 9, 1968

The battle began with a massive North Vietnamese artillery bombardment of the US Marine garrison at Khe Sanh, home to around 6,000 Marines. One of the longest and bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War, the Marines and South Vietnamese troops fought off a brutal siege that lasted several months.

This battle, part of the horrific Tet Offensive, was another tough fight where US Marines were encircled and outnumbered. Victory was anything but certain.

The Khe Sanh Combat Base was devastated amid the never-ending shelling. Marines were constantly digging in deeper and rebuilding their defenses.
There was wreckage thrown everywhere," First Lt. Paul Elkan later recalled. "Vehicles were smashed, windshields shattered, blown tires, tents were shredded, pieces of gear, and torn sandbags were everywhere. What had been a combat base looked like rubble."

Worried that Khe Sanh might become America's Dien Bien Phu, President Lyndon Johnson demanded that the base be held at all cost, presenting it as a symbol in the fight against communism in Southeast Asia.

As the North Vietnamese Army hammered Khe Sanh, US forces fired back, hitting the North Vietnamese with incredible firepower. Expert Marine Corps marksmen kept the communist forces from entering the base, but it was American airpower, especially the powerful B-52 bombers, that ultimately broke the siege.

The Khe Sanh Combat Base was destroyed in the fight, and several thousand US troops perished in the battle. The fallen Americans took many more North Vietnamese troops with them, though.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 17, 2020, 2:30 am

1

THE TUBE

The worlds oldest subway, underground (whatever one will call it) Opened in January 1863

20,000 employees Staff who volunteer to work New Years Eve receive a 500 Pound bonus (2016)

1,000,000 ride it New Years Eve when it goes for 24 hours

50,000,000 Pounds a year if repairs + Upgrades of 1.5 Billon Pounds
While lossing 34,000,000 pounds are year in people dodging the fares
Deep-level lines
For the first deep-level tube line, the City and South London Railway, two 10 feet 2 inches (3.10 m) diameter circular tunnels were dug between individual William Street (close to today's Monument station) and Stockwell, under the roads to avoid the need for agreement with owners of property on the surface. This opened in 1890 with electric locomotives that hauled carriages with small opaque windows, nicknamed padded cells.[30] The Waterloo and City Railway opened in 1898,[31] followed by the Central London Railway in 1900, known as the "twopenny tube".[32] These two ran electric trains in circular tunnels having diameters between 11 feet 8 inches (3.56 m) and 12 feet 2.5 inches (3.72 m),[33] whereas the Great Northern and City Railway, which opened in 1904, was built to take main line trains from Finsbury Park to a Moorgate terminus in the City and had 16-foot (4.9 m) diameter tunnels.[34]

While steam locomotives were in use on the Underground there were contrasting health reports. There were many instances of passengers collapsing whilst travelling, due to heat and pollution, leading for calls to clean the air through the installation of garden plants.[35] The Metropolitan even encouraged beards for staff to act as an air filter.[36] There were other reports claiming beneficial outcomes of using the Underground, including the designation of Great Portland Street as a "sanatorium for [sufferers of ...] asthma and bronchial complaints", tonsillitis could be cured with acid gas and the Twopenny Tube cured anorexia

2
AIR FORCE ONE
The "flying Oval Office" has 4,000 square feet of interior floor space. Among its accommodations are:
Conference/dining room
Quarters for the president and the first lady
An office area for senior staff members
Another office that converts into a medical facility when necessary
Work and rest areas for the presidential staff, media representatives and Air Force crews
Two galleys that can provide 100 meals at one sitting
Multi-frequency radios for air-to-air, air-to-ground and satellite communications
Principal differences between Air Force One and the standard Boeing 747 include state-of-the-art navigation, electronic and communications equipment; its interior configuration and furnishings; self-contained baggage loader; and front and aft air-stairs.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » November 17, 2020, 8:20 am

Doodoo wrote:
November 17, 2020, 2:30 am

2
AIR FORCE ONE
The "flying Oval Office" has 4,000 square feet of interior floor space. Among its accommodations are:
Conference/dining room
Quarters for the president and the first lady
An office area for senior staff members
Another office that converts into a medical facility when necessary
Work and rest areas for the presidential staff, media representatives and Air Force crews
Two galleys that can provide 100 meals at one sitting
Multi-frequency radios for air-to-air, air-to-ground and satellite communications
Principal differences between Air Force One and the standard Boeing 747 include state-of-the-art navigation, electronic and communications equipment; its interior configuration and furnishings; self-contained baggage loader; and front and aft air-stairs.
Not forgetting the Escape Pod of course ....... which has been in ground storage for the past 4 years, because the Bloated Orange Bullshiitter is too obese to fit into it. 8)

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 17, 2020, 10:07 am

There is NO escape pod on Air Force One

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » November 17, 2020, 10:44 am

Of course there is - I saw it in a movie.

Here .... at 7.47



:-"

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » November 17, 2020, 12:45 pm

Doodoo wrote:
November 15, 2020, 7:47 am
2
Heathrow
Nearly 600 people are extradited back to their countries via Heathrow on various criminal warrants

Lost a bag ? They handle over 40 Million bags a year.
30 miles of conveyors

74,000,000 passengers a year thats 203,000 people a day
As a matter of interest, what year is this referring to? It can’t be this year

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 17, 2020, 1:53 pm

Googke and the adventure will begin

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 17, 2020, 1:57 pm

Jack
You say tomato I say tomato

Wikipedia
Air Force One is shown as being equipped with a one-person escape pod for emergency use by the President of the United States in at least four films, Escape from New York, Air Force One, Bermuda Tentacles, and Big Game. The actual Air Force One does not have an escape pod.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » November 17, 2020, 2:21 pm

I wonder if the pod makes a "whoosh" sound when it exits AF1. ;)

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » November 17, 2020, 2:29 pm

Doodoo wrote:
November 17, 2020, 1:53 pm
Googke and the adventure will begin
It was a reasonable question to what you had posted.
Never mind feckin smart ar$e

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 17, 2020, 3:37 pm

I aint here to work for you
The work on my part was and is already done by posting

What shall I call you in return, let me think
Not worth it

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » November 17, 2020, 3:48 pm

Who asking you to work?
You could have just replied with the year as asked or if you failed to notice from the hasty copy & paste job, said the website you’ve plagiarised & I could look for myself but oh no, your reply look on google.
Next time you ask a question on here, & it seems quite often, just check google instead.
Still a feckin smart ar$se

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Khun Paul » November 17, 2020, 3:51 pm

Niggly wrote:
November 17, 2020, 3:48 pm
Who asking you to work?
You could have just replied with the year as asked or if you failed to notice from the hasty copy & paste job, said the website you’ve plagiarised & I could look for myself but oh no, your reply look on google.
Next time you ask a question on here, & it seems quite often, just check google instead.
Still a feckin smart ar$se
AH NOW the real Smart Arse replies, wonderful .....lol

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » November 17, 2020, 3:57 pm

Khun Paul wrote:
November 17, 2020, 3:51 pm

AH NOW the real Smart Arse replies, wonderful .....lol
Hi Mods. We have a Code 88 with this massive fanny butting in. Requesting covert ops strait jacket deployment.

Over & out

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