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Thailand laws, tips and advice.
bumper
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Post by bumper » January 7, 2012, 9:37 am

Pulling the plug just hit me the longer I'm kept alive the longer the money keeps coming in. So I going to scratch that one off my list

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semperfiguy
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Post by semperfiguy » January 7, 2012, 9:56 am

I am assuming the OP is an American citizen, so you may want to have a look at the following US Embassy BKK website if you haven't already:

http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/service/de ... tizen.html

If you die in a hospital, a call will be made by the hospital staff to the US Embassy of your behalf and a Thai death certificate will be prepared locally. The wife/next-of-kin can also follow up with the US Embassy to make sure that a Consular Report of Death of an American Citizen Abroad is prepared to be used back in the States, together with the Thai Death Certificate (and translated original), to settle a US Estate. Communication between the US Embassy and the responsible party can be affected by fax and/or email. No autopsy is needed unless the death is suspicious. I would certainly get a verbal/written release from the US Embassy before the body goes for cremation to make sure there are no hitches with getting that very important Report of Death from our embassy.

If death occurs outside the hospital, in the home for example, have the body transported by ambulance to the hospital for a doctor's official confirmation of the death and subsequent preparation of the Thai Death Certificate.

Thai Last Will and Testaments for the Kingdom are not probated unless they are contested. I took mine to my bank and showed it to the Manager. He said when I kick the bucket my wife can walk in with the Last Will and claim everything she has coming to her with no complications.
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf". - George Orwell

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semperfiguy
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Post by semperfiguy » January 7, 2012, 10:00 am

bumper wrote:Pulling the plug just hit me the longer I'm kept alive the longer the money keeps coming in. So I going to scratch that one off my list
Sounds good in theory bumper, but whose paying to keep the "plug" in?
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf". - George Orwell

bumper
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Post by bumper » January 7, 2012, 11:46 am

The person who gets the monthly money.

Your theory on the banks sounds good. But, thus far I have not seen a widow who didn't have a problem with that.

My wife has been told to get the ATM card and empty that puppy.

Users results can vary this Thailand what they say and what they do can often be two different things.

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semperfiguy
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Post by semperfiguy » January 7, 2012, 11:55 am

bumper wrote:The person who gets the monthly money.

Your theory on the banks sounds good. But, thus far I have not seen a widow who didn't have a problem with that.

My wife has been told to get the ATM card and empty that puppy.

Users results can vary this Thailand what they say and what they do can often be two different things.
I understand...that's why I have plan A, B and C just in case. In Thailand I live by Murphy's Law: If anything can go wrong, then it will! Unloading the account with the ATM card is actually plan A with the Will to be used as a last resort in all cases where assets are to be claimed.
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf". - George Orwell

bumper
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Post by bumper » January 7, 2012, 3:32 pm

Keep Murphy in the hip pocket and things seem to work out

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Post by LoneTraveler » January 10, 2012, 10:08 am

Thank you all for some sound advice based upon some of your personal experiences, it has eliminated the stress my lady had concerning an autopsy in Bangkok (unless of course something appears to be a foul in the minds of the police).

Anyone have experience with an ambulance service in terms of cost. If I am to be transported to a hospital for an illness or upon death will they ask for payment prior to transport or bill my Thai Partner later. I want to make sure I have cash on hand for this service if payment is required up front. Or, will they not release the body until payment is made? Also, what is the procedure for the return of the remains when all the paper work is complete? Will my lady be responsible to claim me and transport me to the local Buddha Wat for cremation in the back of a pick-up?

I am trying (perhaps too much) to make my death in terms of paper work and dealing with the Officials involved, as stress free as possible for her so that she can get on with the cremation and therefore, her life. She has been and continues to be a good partner in my life so I feel it is well worth the effort.

It is a relief to have a forum such as this one because trying to obtain accurate information about most things in Thailand has been my most frustrating venture since living here.

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Post by Ray.Charles » January 10, 2012, 7:46 pm

One other item that I would consider would be to prepare a Living Will

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Post by trubrit » January 11, 2012, 6:49 am

You've just got to believe this. :-" A husband of a friend recently died in the hospital in Khon Kaen .A hospital mini bus wanted 10k to transport his body back to Udon, however a kind nurse suggested that an ambulance bus, the same one? :-" would only cost 4k. So the body accompanied by the nurse was wheeled out complete with an oxygen respirator mask, placed in the bus and taken as a live patient . The nurse refused the proffered 1k tip .TIT :roll:
Ageing is a privilige denied to many .

bumper
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Post by bumper » January 11, 2012, 8:55 am

One other thing I would consider with a legal document to be acted upon in Thailand is to use the Thai language. I ave no idea what other agency required. But, as recently four years ago the Thai Court here in Udon would not recognize a contract written in English.

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semperfiguy
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Post by semperfiguy » January 11, 2012, 10:07 am

trubrit wrote:You've just got to believe this. :-" A husband of a friend recently died in the hospital in Khon Kaen .A hospital mini bus wanted 10k to transport his body back to Udon, however a kind nurse suggested that an ambulance bus, the same one? :-" would only cost 4k. So the body accompanied by the nurse was wheeled out complete with an oxygen respirator mask, placed in the bus and taken as a live patient . The nurse refused the proffered 1k tip .TIT :roll:
Back in the States I managed funeral homes and cemeteries for 13 years before retirement. A body can be released to the legal next of kin from the hospital once the death certificate has been signed off on by the doctor. An ambulance bus may be a more respectful way to transport a body to its final city of destination, but if worse comes to worse, it's perfectly legal to put a body in the back seat of a car and drive it back home if finances become a problem. I'm sure if you check with hospital staff here they will tell you the same thing unless they prefer to make extra money off of you in which case you will not get the entire truth.
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf". - George Orwell

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Post by maaka » January 13, 2012, 10:10 am

my old man has weeks, maybe days to go before he kicks the bucket from the Big C, and I have been waste high in legal matters..Mainly because the picture keeps changing.. Both Ma and Da had Wills done in 1999, and then revamped in 2009..if Da went first everything went to Ma, and vice versa..ok sweet..I am the trustee of the wills...both my parents fell and broke their hips and the slide set in..last year Ma started going alittle bonkers in the head, so the matter of Enduring Power of Attorney came to the forefront...chatted with Da about it, but being a stubborn man he did nothing about it. I think we broached the topic five times, even paid a visit to his lawyer to enquire what it entails, but no Dad sat on the fence. Ma started getting worse, having invisable friends and all..finally Dad decided when he knew he couldnt manage by himself so to speak, to go for the Power of Attorney, thing was now the lawyer wanted a medical opinion as to whether Ma knew what she would be signing re Power of Attorney..couple of days before Xmas the lawyer gives me Power of Attorney from Dad, but not for mum..now what, how do I organise her health and well being when dad looks like he is going to pop off any day now..I suggested to the lawyer that we would have to change dad will, because he left everything to Ma, the house the saving the whole ruddy lot..Da wont be coming home, I cant manage anymore with the two of them , so a retirement home with hospital care is where he will go come monday, but thats a $4000NZ a month.. I dont have that, cant get money off mum when dad dies to pay for her care..things were snowballing...the lawyer hmmm and haaaaa on it, but it was Xmas and he was off until 16th january...if everything went to Ma the family would have to contest matters in court, which is expensive..it came down to me to make the Executive decision type up a new will for dad, which would leave his share of the house to the family, so they could stop the government taking it later to pay for mums retirement home care..I had to move quick because dad is just about Non compus mentus..the lawyer is alway, I needed two witnesses to sign the will and a doctor to say dad was good enough to sign as, and that happened today....moral of the story is that you can have a will and everything set in stone, but if you loose your marbles, someone else steps in to manage your affairs, unless you have someone to manage your affairs via enduring power of attorney, and attend to your wishes...we all think we will die in a nice easy way, but hell it can get complicated, so a buddy, a family member needs to be on the ball to get things as you want them to be, should you go into a coma, or go silly in the head for months, and yuou no longer can give instructions..

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Post by bumper » January 13, 2012, 4:04 pm

You know this is timely for me I try to do an annual review make sure I have everything needed in the envelope. Things do change and you do need to review my goal is once a year. Sorry for your troubles it a real nightmare, for those left holding the ball. If things are not up to date

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Post by nkstan » January 14, 2012, 7:02 am

bumper wrote:The person who gets the monthly money.

Your theory on the banks sounds good. But, thus far I have not seen a widow who didn't have a problem with that.

My wife has been told to get the ATM card and empty that puppy.

Users results can vary this Thailand what they say and what they do can often be two different things.
My stepdaughter is my sole heir in Thailand.I told her the same,If I die,before notifying anyone,take the bank book and the ATM card and empty the accounts!

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Post by LoneTraveler » January 14, 2012, 8:40 am

I agree with maaka that one cannot predict the future of our health or the manner in which we may die (in most cases) when we are preparing a Last Will. Some may be given a "heads-up if terminally ill or, some other immediate life-threatening condition. But for most of us we only think in terms of a quick and quiet death (fatal heart attack or embolism to lung or brain or, for many expats here, motorcycle and /or car accident). Having worked in health care for over 30 years, I have wittiness many variations of death in terms of manner and time. Therefore, we need to be flexible when preparing for our demise and keep a number of scenarios in mind when preparing a will (to include a living will comes to mind). We can only hope for a quiet and quick death but as we all know fate can drop a bucket of **** on our heads at any time. My hope is that I have enough warning so I can give my lady the PIN number to the ATM accounts so as stated in a post here, "empty that puppy" before the legal hounds come knocking at my door.

My only asset is my bank accounts, otherwise I am single and own nothing. I am not secure enough in my relationship now, or anytime in the near future, to give out the PIN number to my accounts. Too many sad stories of expats getting their accounts drained and assets sold off when in loving and trusting relationships, both long and short term . But I agree with advice here which is; upon my death, "take the money and run" before the "powers that be" get their hands on it. I do not trust the banks to turn the money over to my lady because that is my wish in my will.

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