Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 27, 2021, 7:20 am

1

batshit
adjective Slang: Vulgar.(usually in the phrase go batshit)
insane; crazy:
My ex went completely batshit when we broke up.
Dude, you’ve been making some batshit decisions late2


2

Chilling Coffee Beans Will Ruin The Flavor
Whether you have whole coffee beans, grounds, or K-cups, keep them away from the fridge. Coffee beans should stay away from heat, light, and moisture, says the National Coffee Association. Wetness will make the coffee taste worse.
Keep your coffee beans cool and dry. Seal them in an airtight container; exposure to air will make them go stale. While coffee beans don’t go bad, they will lose their flavor the more they are exposed to cold, heat, air, or moisture.

3
Cucumbers Go Bad More Quickly In The Fridge
Believe it or not, cucumbers last longer when they are stored at room temperature. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that cucumbers are sensitive to temperatures under 50°F. Refrigerators are kept between 38°F and 40°F.
When cucumbers are in the fridge, they can get “chilling injuries.” The excess moisture makes cucumbers rot more quickly. They can develop bruises, become slimy, or turn black. If you prefer cold cucumbers, stick them in the fridge for a few minutes before eating.
4
You Don’t Want Droopy Carrots
Refrigerators create condensation, and carrots rot more quickly when they are wet. They may become soggy and droopy if they become wet. Keep them dry by storing them at room temperature.
Outside of the fridge, carrots stay fresh for three to five days. If you want them to last longer, wrap them in a paper towel before placing them in the fridge. Replace the paper towel every few days. This will keep the carrots dry and prevent drooping.



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 28, 2021, 8:22 am

1
Spatchcock Chicken
A dressed and split fowl for roasting or grilling.
tr.v. spatch·cocked, spatch·cock·ing, spatch·cocks
1. To prepare (a dressed fowl) for roasting or grilling by splitting open.



2

What animal was used to lay cables around Buckingham Palace for Dianna and Charles wedding and th ebroadcast

a) a mole
b) a badger
c) a ferret

3

Whta 1993 movie is concerned with activities around Gobblers jerk

a) Grumpy Old Men
b) Jurassic Park
c) Ground Hog Day









ANSWERS

#2
c ferret

#3
c Ground Hog Day

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 29, 2021, 5:38 am

1


Knurr and spell (also called northern spell,[1] nipsy or trap ball) is an old English game, once popular as a pub game.


The game originated in the moors of Yorkshire, in England, but then spread throughout the north of England.[2] It can be traced back to the beginning of the 14th century.[citation needed] It was especially popular in the 18th and 19th centuries, but was virtually unknown by the 21st century,[3] though there was a local revival in the 1970s.[4] As late as the 1930s exhibition games of knur and spell by veterans drew large crowds to the Rusland Valley in North Lancashire, according to the chronicles of the North-West Evening Mail, but even then it was regarded as an archaic game.
A man from Golcar, West Yorkshire was recorded in 1974 for the Survey of English Dialects discussing knurr and spell being played around the turn of the twentieth century.

2
FOOD POISIONING
Poultry
Chicken (12% of food-borne illnesses) and turkey (8%) can harbor many pathogens and are a huge source of salmonella contamination.
Chicken needs to be cooked to a safe internal temperature of 165ºF to consume. It should never be washed, which can spread the bacteria to other surfaces. Leftovers should be refrigerated promptly. Read more about tips on the CDC's site.

Seafood
Contaminated seafood causes 9% of food poisoning cases. Again, you need to cook seafood, including shellfish (5%) and fish (4%) to a safe temperature and reheat leftovers.

The CDC suggests 145°F for all raw food and to reheat leftovers to 165°F. Sorry, sushi lovers and oyster connoisseurs, but these are hotbed foods. Eat with the knowledge that you could get sick and get your seafood from a trusted source.

Dairy
Raw dairy (5% of foodborne illness cases) is really the issue here. In the U.S. you are unlikely to encounter these products in the supermarket since most are illegal. But still, be cautious and keep your food out of the "danger zone" and use proper preparation techniques. The CDC describes the "danger zone" as between 40°F and 140°F for longer than 2 hours (or 1 hour if it's hotter than 90°F outside).

2
PINEAPPLE

It may reduce high blood pressure.
"The enzymes in pineapple known as bromelain slow blood clotting, as well as increase red and white blood cells production, which leads to improved blood flow," says Valdez.


and

It could cause excessive bleeding.
Bromelain also works as an anti-coagulant that thins the blood and prevents blood from clotting, which may cause excessive bleeding.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » September 30, 2021, 6:08 am

1

In 1958 two pilots flew a Cessna for more than two months without landing, refueling by matching speed with a truck driving down a road. Their record has not been broken

2

Things NOT to do with the Left Hand
Open the left-hand side doors
Using your left hand to open any of the car doors on the left-hand side of your car increases the risk of "dooring" accidents (where a bicycle rider coming up alongside of the car gets hit by an opening car door). If you open the door with your right hand—a method known as the "Dutch reach"—you're forced to pivot toward the left side of the car, which means you're more likely to see a bicycle coming up on your left.

Exchanging money in the Middle East
In the Middle East, it's considered rude to touch money with your left hand. It's also rude to pick anything up with your left hand. And as in Ethiopia and India, it's considered rude to eat with the left hand in the Middle East.

Lefties are more like to think outside the box
According to the American Psychological Association, ten per cent of the population is left-handed. And according to a study in the Journal of Mental and Nervous Disease musicians, painters and writers were significantly more likely to be left-handed. Brain hemisphere specialist Michael Corballis, PhD, a psychologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, points out that just as information is prone to errors as it traverses between brain hemispheres, it’s also more likely to encounter novel solutions. Righties might dismiss an idea as too radical, but lefties might be able to develop a solution that a right-hander’s brain would skip right over. “It’s good to have a few people in any society who think outside the square,” Corballis says.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 1, 2021, 5:28 am

1

The second officer of the Titanic refused to get off the ship until he had helped the others and got trapped underwater. A boiler exploded that set him free. He then served in World War II and saved the lives of 127 men at Dunkirk.
2

Canada and Denmark have had one of the funniest border disputes in history over an island. Each nation’s military will visit the place, uproot the other country’s flag, and leave a welcome note with a bottle of schnapps or Canadian Club depending upon their nationality.
A strange dispute has been going on for over three decades now over the barren Hans Island located far in Arctic north. No one knows why Canada and Denmark have been fighting over this half-a-square-mile territory for so long. The crux of the dispute is that, according to international law, countries can claim territories up to 12 miles from their shores, but Hans Island lies within 12 miles of both countries. It was declared to be a Danish territory by the League of Nations, but after that body dissolved, there has been no certainty about its status.

The dispute began sometime in 1984 when a minister from Denmark placed the Danish flag there with a welcome note and a bottle of brandy. This started a battle of sorts. Today, if the Canadian army visits the territory, they leave a note that says, “Welcome to Canada” and a bottle of Canadian Club. If the Danish army visits, they leave a bottle of schnapps with a similar note. This war has been dubbed as the “Whiskey War,” and the governments have kept a good sense of humor over it. Plans are underway to make Hans Island a shared territory.

3
The Pistola Con Caricato (upwards-loading pistol) is that revolver. Complete with three barrels and 18 chambers, for all its appeal it is somewhat of a mystery gun. Chambered in .25 ACP we know it had to have been made during the 20th century, as the cartridge wasn’t developed until 1905. We also don’t know if it is double-action, although that technology had certainly cemented itself by that time.
We do know that the gun had five operating modes. It has a selector that allows the shooter to fire from the first, second, or third chamber only as well as fire all three chambers at once. People can go on at length about the .25 ACP and its stopping power, but three at once is nothing to laugh at. And the selector also acted as a safety, being able to disable all three firing pins.
While .25 ACP is, generally speaking now, a pocket pistol cartridge, this revolver would be hard to tuck away, even with a good holster. It would have been a fascinating service piece if it had ever taken off. Clearly, it didn’t. You can see more photos on the Horst Held Antiques website or the Interesting Firearms section of (we’re not joking) Vince’s Worthwhile Website.

We have to think something similar could be made today, and maybe even in .380 ACP, so long as it managed to not fire more than one bullet per pull of the trigger (the ATF was invented sometime after 1905 as well). Heizer Arms, what’s your next project?

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 2, 2021, 5:20 am

1

MASH 4077

Rosie’s Bar was real. It was actually named Rose’s Bar and was a local watering hole in Uijongbu, Korea for US soldiers and other US troops in the area. It was located down an alley just outside Camp Mosier.

Radar’s teddy bear, exhibited at the Smithsonian, was sold at auction on July 29, 2005, for $11,800. The teddy was originally found on the set at Fox Ranch, where the series was filmed.

On Sesame Street, Big Bird’s teddy bear is named Radar. This is in homage to Radar O’Reilly’s teddy bear.
Col. Blake’s alma mater was the University of Illinois. When word of this reached the university, a U of I sweater (of appropriate vintage) was donated to the show, and Blake can be seen wearing the blue sweater with a large orange “I” in several episodes. An orange mug with a blue “I” also appeared on his office desk.

Jamie Farr and Alan Alda were the only two cast members to have actually served in the US Army in Korea. Both of them did their tours of duty after the 1953 cease fire.


2

Do's and Dont's

If your dishwashing sponge gets stinky, toss it. Even if you are regularly washing and sanitizing your sponge, you may need to get rid of it after less use than you'd think. Sponges hold onto a lot of bacteria, and it's better to be safe than sorry.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 3, 2021, 5:43 am

1

asparamancer
OK, so I've heard of mystics gazing into crystal balls, reading tarot cards and deciphering tea leaves in China cups as methods of predicting what will happen in the future, but flinging asparagus about the place is a new one to me!

Jemima describes herself as "the world's only asparamancer", which is a person who casts asparagus spears on a flat surface to reveal what is in store by the patterns they make.

2

Bad Things in the morning

Eating a sugary breakfast
Doughuts, muffins, and other coffee shop treats may tickle our taste buds, but they also do a number on our stomachs. According to an article written by Tehrene Firman, these sugary foods can spike your blood sugar and set you up for a crash later on. Opt instead for wholegrain bread, oatmeal, or protein and fibre-rich foods. A balanced breakfast will keep you full longer and help improve concentration throughout your day.

Brushing your teeth right after you eat
Brushing your teeth right after breakfast is not a great idea. You should wait at least 30 minutes after eating to take care of dental hygiene. Acidic foods can weaken the enamel on your teeth, and brushing too soon can actually work the acid further into your enamel. If you want, rinse out your mouth with water right after a meal while waiting to brush.

Not having a morning routine
Everything in life is about balance, even when we first open our eyes. By establishing a morning routine, you’ll be more likely to create and maintain healthy habits. It will also help you get going and keep going throughout the day. Each person’s routine is unique. Set some personal goals and trust yourself to determine its duration.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 4, 2021, 1:50 am

1

Facts about Cambodia

Cambodia has the largest population of amputees in the world caused by landmines. Over 64,000 casualties related to landmines have been recorded since 1979. Almost half of the landmines are yet to be removed.

It is a harsh fact about Cambodia that more than two and a half million people in the country live on less than $1.20 per day.

Known as S-21, the most important prison in Cambodia held almost 14,000 prisoners, only 12 of whom survived. The Khmer Rouge was responsible for the detention, interrogation, and execution of these many prisoners.

2

Ways you can destroy your Immune System
You're Deficient In Vitamin D
An adequate vitamin D level is protective against several types of cancer. And D seems to help guard against colds and flu as well. According to a study published in the Journal of Investigative Medicine, a low vitamin D level is associated with "an increased susceptibility to infection" and increased autoimmunity, in which the immune system becomes confused and begins attacking the body instead of protecting it. Fifty percent of people worldwide are deficient in vitamin D, the National Institutes of Health says.

The Rx: According to the NIH's Office of Dietary Supplements, adults should get 600 IU of vitamin D daily, and 800 after age 70. (It also protects bone health.) Your doctor can test for vitamin D deficiency with a simple blood test, and advise you on a vitamin D supplement if it's a good idea.

You're Not Washing Your Hands Long Enough
That MSU study found that only 5 percent of us wash our hands correctly, only one in three people use soap, and 1 in 10 don't bother with the basin at all. Not washing your hands exposes you to all kinds of disease-causing bacteria and viruses, from the common cold to norovirus to strep and staph.

The Rx: Here's advice from the people who should know: the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends washing your hands vigorously using soap and water for 15 to 20 seconds—about the time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday" twice. But the MSU researchers found that bathroom users only washed their hands for an average of 6 seconds, and just 5 percent of people washed their hands for 15 seconds or more.

You're Not Using Hand Sanitizer At The Grocery Store
A recent study found that more than half the shopping carts at an average grocery store carry disease-causing bacteria, such as E. coli, which can cause diarrhea, nausea and fever. A separate study found that handles in the freezer section of a superstore held 33,340 bacteria colonies per square inch—more than a thousand times the bacteria found on the average cell phone.

The Rx: Some grocery stores have antibacterial wipes you can use to wipe down the handle of your shopping cart. You can also buy a pack to bring with you. Wipe the handle, then let it dry completely for 20 seconds before you touch it.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 5, 2021, 4:17 am

1

tramline
noun
1.
a railway track for a tramcar.

2

Adze
An adze (/ædz/; alternative spelling: adz) is an ancient and versatile cutting tool similar to an axe but with the cutting edge perpendicular to the handle rather than parallel. They have been used since the Stone Age. Adzes are used for smoothing or carving wood in hand woodworking, and as a hoe for agriculture and horticulture. Two basic forms of an adze are the hand adze (short hoe) —a short handled tool swung with one hand— and the foot adze (hoe) —a long handled tool capable of powerful swings using both hands, the cutting edge usually striking at foot or shin level. A similar tool is called a mattock, which differs by having two blades, one perpendicular to the handle and one parallel.

3

The world's longest road tunnel is in Norway
At an astonishing 15 miles (24.5 km) long, the Lærdal Tunnel is the world’s longest. Costing 1 billion Norwegian kroner to build (that's about USD $110 million) the tunnel connects the small communities of Lærdal and Aurland

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 6, 2021, 1:35 am

1

Norway rocks the Winter Olympics
Perhaps unsurprising given the facts above, Norway is the world's most successful nation at the Winter Olympic Games. Despite having little more than 5 million residents, Norway has won more medals than any other country in Olympic history.

Following the 2018 games in South Korea, Norway's total medal haul stood at 368, including 132 golds, from the 23 competitions. Their closest rivals in the table are the United States (305/105) and Germany (238/92).

The country hosted the event twice: In 1952 in Oslo, and in 1994 in Lillehammer. The legacy of the latter competition continues to this day, and the Norwegian Olympic Museum in Lillehammer is one of the country's most interesting museums.
Another fun Olympic-related fact about Norway: individual Olav V won an Olympic gold medal in sailing in 1928. He was an active sailor throughout his life and his reign.

2
There was a human baby born on Antarctica.
Emilio Marcos Palma’s mother was sent by Argentina down to the Argentine Fortín Sargento Cabral, found at the Esperanza Base at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, mainly so the country could have first-born bragging rights (and so they could claim a portion of Antarctica as Argentine soil). Emilio appeared on the snowy scene on January 7, 1978, weighing in at 7lb and 8 oz.

3
Where did George Lucas get the for the character Chewbacca?
a) His dog Indiana
b) Yogi Bear the cartoon character
c) Baloo from the Jungle Book



ANSWER
3a) To George Lucas, his pet Indiana became much more—the inspiration behind one of the most beloved characters in the Star Wars saga: Chewbacca. The friendship between Han Solo and his copilot was born out of Lucas’s appreciation for his dog Indiana, who, like Chewbacca, was strong, brave, resilient, imposing, playful, and fiercely loyal.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 7, 2021, 12:24 am

1

What was the original colour associated with St Patrick;s Day

a) Blue
b) Orange
c) Red

2

Witold Pilecki (13 May 1901 – 25 May 1948; Polish pronunciation: [ˈvitɔlt piˈlɛt͡skʲi]; codenames Roman Jezierski, Tomasz Serafiński, Druh, Witold) was a Polish cavalry officer, intelligence agent, and resistance leader. Early in World War II he co-founded the Secret Polish Army resistance movement.

In 1940 Pilecki volunteered[1][2][3][4] to allow himself to be captured by the occupying Germans in order to infiltrate the Auschwitz concentration camp.[5] At Auschwitz he organized a resistance movement that eventually included hundreds of inmates, and he secretly drew up reports detailing German atrocities at the camp, which were smuggled out to Home Army headquarters and shared with the Western Allies.[3]

Later, having escaped from Auschwitz, Pilecki fought in the Warsaw Uprising of August–October 1944. Following its suppression, he was interned in a German prisoner-of-war camp.[6][2] After the communist takeover of Poland he remained loyal to the London-based Polish Government-in-Exile. In 1945 he returned to Poland to report to the Exile Government on the situation in Poland.[2] Before returning, Pilecki wrote Witold's Report on the Auschwitz concentration camp, anticipating that he might be killed by Poland's new communist authorities.[2][7][8][5]

In 1947 he was arrested by the secret police on charges of working for "foreign imperialism"[3] and, after being subjected to torture[2] and a show trial, was executed in 1948. His story remained mostly unknown for several decades; one of the first accounts of Pilecki's mission to Auschwitz was given by Polish historian Józef Garliński, himself a former Auschwitz inmate who emigrated to Britain after the war, in Fighting Auschwitz: The Resistance Movement in the Concentration Camp (1975).[9][8]

Poland's Chief Rabbi, Michael Schudrich, writes in the foreword to a 2012 English translation of Pilecki's report: "When God created the human being, God had in mind that we should all be like Captain Witold Pilecki, of blessed memory."[10] Historian Norman Davies writes in the introduction to the same translation: "If there was an Allied hero who deserved to be remembered and celebrated, this was a person with few peers."









ANSWER

1a) Blue

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » October 7, 2021, 3:34 am

Doodoo wrote:
October 7, 2021, 12:24 am
1

What was the original colour associated with St Patrick;s Day

a) Blue
b) Orange
c) Red
It's orange.
กรรม

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 7, 2021, 5:16 am

Ernie
Best you do some research as to the Original colur for the Irish

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 8, 2021, 7:43 am

1

The Millennium Dome raid was an attempted robbery of the Millennium Dome's diamond exhibition in Greenwich, South East London occurring on 7 November 2000. A local gang planned to ram-raid the De Beers diamond exhibition which was being held in the riverside Dome at the time. The gang had then planned to escape via the Thames in a speedboat.

The De Beers diamond exhibition had a number of jewels on display, including the Millennium Star, a flawless 203.04 carats (40.608 g) gem with an estimated worth of £200 million (£339 million today) and considered one of the most perfect gems in the world. Also on display were priceless blue diamonds.[1]

The attempted robbery was foiled by the Flying Squad of the Metropolitan Police Service, as a result of information from Kent Police Serious Crime who already had the gang members under surveillance for their suspected roles in a number of unsuccessful armoured vehicle robberies. The operation to foil the robbery was the biggest operation undertaken in the Flying Squad's history and at trial the judge in the case commended the way it was carried out.[2]

If the heist had succeeded, then with a haul of £350 million (£593 million today) worth of diamonds, it would have become one of the biggest robberies in history.

2

Dangerous Foods

Blood clams
With a name as ominous as blood clams, you might expect there to be danger involved. However, the molluscs’ red color, caused by high levels of haemoglobin (the protein that makes blood red), is not what makes them risky. It's because they're often eaten raw and have a track record of spreading diseases including hepatitis A, typhoid and dysentery. They must be boiled for long enough to kill any bacteria.

Raw cashews
If you love to snack on cashew nuts, you may be surprised to see them on this list. But in their raw, unprocessed state, cashews contain urushiol which is a chemical also found in poison ivy. It causes skin rashes and can be lethal if ingested in high doses. It's a good job the type you find in the grocery store are cooked at a high heat at least once before sale. Cashews might still be labeled as raw if they haven't been flavored or roasted further, but they will have been treated and are safe to eat.

Starfruit
Becoming more common in grocery stores in the US and UK, starfruit is a bittersweet fruit with a distinct five-point shape, native to Asia. Most people have no trouble eating it, but it must be avoided by those with kidney problems. It contains a toxin, which if not broken down by the kidneys, causes neurological conditions.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 9, 2021, 12:27 am

1


drap·er
noun
1.
a person who sells cloth and dry goods:
dated British
"as a young man he was employed in a draper's shop"

2

James Croll, FRS, (2 January 1821 – 15 December 1890) was a 19th-century Scottish scientist who developed a theory of climate variability based on changes in the Earth's orbit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Croll


3

In what field was Yoko Ono in prior to meeting John Lennon?

a) art
b) Architeture
c) aviation

4

What is the name given to sound that escapes from headphones?

a) seepage
b) Leakage
c) drainage












ANSWERS

1a) ART

2b) LEAKAGE

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 10, 2021, 4:19 am

1

What is the largest country in Africa

a) South Africa
b) Sudan
c) Egypt

2

PANAMA CANAL


Linking the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the 51-mile Panama Canal transformed global trade routes when it opened in 1914. After a failed attempt by the French in the 1880s, the United States re-started construction in 1904. Chief engineer John Stevens altered the project’s design from a sea-level canal to one requiring a series of locks and the damming of the Chagres River to create the world’s largest man-made lake at the time. Workers battled landslides and tropical diseases such as malaria and yellow fever as they carved the canal through jungles and mountainous terrain, displacing enough earth and rubble, according to the Panama Canal Museum, to bury the island of Manhattan to a depth of 12 feet. Ten percent of the 56,000 workers who toiled on the project between 1904 and 1913 died. Perhaps the most remarkable feat? The international ship channel was completed on time and on budget.

3

While in Tibet for the 7 years Hendrich Harrer taught the monks to ?

a) Fly Kites
b) Ice Skate
c) Speak English















ANSWERS

1b) SUDAN

3c) Ice Skate

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 11, 2021, 7:48 am

1

A symbol of friendship between France and the United States, the 151-foot-tall Statue of Liberty was dedicated in 1886. In Paris, French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi fashioned large copper sheets to create the statue’s skin, which was packed in more than 200 crates and shipped to New York City. Over a four-month period, workers pieced together the statue, mounted it on a pedestal and affixed it to an iron-and-steel skeleton engineered by Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc and Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel, designer of the Eiffel Tower, that allowed the skin to move independently during strong wind gusts.

2

What TV personality spent his summers interning for the CIA

a) Tom Brokaw
b) Anderson Cooper
c) Maury Povich

3


The praxinoscope was an animation device, the successor to the zoetrope. It was invented in France in 1877 by Charles-Émile Reynaud. Like the zoetrope, it used a strip of pictures placed around the inner surface of a spinning cylinder. The praxinoscope improved on the zoetrope by replacing its narrow viewing slits with an inner circle of mirrors,[1] placed so that the reflections of the pictures appeared more or less stationary in position as the wheel turned. Someone looking in the mirrors would therefore see a rapid succession of images producing the illusion of motion, with a brighter and less distorted picture than the zoetrope offered.


ANSWERS

1b) Andrerson Cooper

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 12, 2021, 4:02 am

1

To void mating, dragonflies do what?

a) Fly in circles
b) Fake their own deaths
c) Pretend to be lame


2

On October 6, 1866, the brothers John and Simeon Reno stage the first train robbery in American history, making off with $13,000 from an Ohio and Mississippi railroad train in Jackson County, Indiana.

Of course, trains had been robbed before the Reno brothers’ holdup. But these previous crimes had all been burglaries of stationary trains sitting in depots or freight yards. The Reno brothers’ contribution to criminal history was to stop a moving train in a sparsely populated region where they could carry out their crime without risking interference from the law or curious bystanders.Though created in Indiana, the Reno brother’s new method of robbing trains quickly became very popular in the West. Many bandits, who might otherwise have been robbing banks or stagecoaches, discovered that the newly constructed transcontinental and regional railroads in the West made attractive targets. With the western economy booming, trains often carried large amounts of cash and precious minerals. The wide-open spaces of the West also provided train robbers with plenty of isolated areas ideal for stopping trains, as well as plenty of wild spaces where they could hide from the law. Some criminal gangs, like Butch Cassidy’s Wild Bunch, found that robbing trains was so easy and lucrative that for a time they made it their criminal specialty.
The railroad owners, however, were not about to sit back and let Cassidy or any other bandit freely pillage their trains. To their dismay, would-be train robbers increasingly found that the cash and precious metals on trains were well protected in massive safes watched over by heavily armed guards. Some railroads, such as the Union Pacific, even began adding special boxcars designed to carry guards and their horses. In the event of an attempted robbery, these men could not only protect the train’s valuables, but could also quickly mount their horses and chase down the fleeing bandits—hopefully putting a permanent end to their criminal careers. As a result, by the late 19th century, train robbery was becoming an increasingly difficult—and dangerous—profession.

ANSWERS

b) Fake their own deaths

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 13, 2021, 5:10 am

1

FISH CALLED WANDA

ONE AUDIENCE MEMBER LAUGHED HIMSELF TO DEATH.
Ole Bentzen, a Belgian audience member, was so tickled by the scene in which Ken has French fries stuck up his nose, that he actually laughed himself to death. The scene reminded him of a similar experience at a family dinner, in which his family had shoved cauliflower up their noses to great comic effect. He began laughing so hard, his heart rate escalated dangerously, causing a fatal heart attack.

2
Why did Jim Morison not play Woodstock in 1969
1) He wasnt headlining
2) He wasnt paid enough
3) He was worried someone would shoot him while on stage

3
A Bangalore torpedo is an explosive charge placed within one or several connected tubes. It is used by combat engineers to clear obstacles that would otherwise require them to approach directly, possibly under fire. It is sometimes colloquially referred to as a "Bangalore mine", "banger" or simply "Bangalore" as well as a pole charge.

Per United States Army Field Manual 5-250 section 1-14, page 1-12 "b. Use. The primary use of the torpedo is clearing paths through wire obstacles and heavy undergrowth. It will clear a 3- to 4-metre wide path through wire obstacles."
The Bangalore torpedo was devised by Captain R. L. McClintock,[1] of the Royal Engineers while attached to the Madras Sappers and Miners unit of the Indian Army at Bangalore, India, in 1912. He invented it as a means of blowing up booby traps and barricades left over from the Second Boer War and the Russo-Japanese War.[2] The Bangalore torpedo could be exploded over a mine without a sapper having to approach closer than about 3 m (10 ft).

Bangalore torpedoes were manufactured until 2017 by Mondial Defence Systems of Poole, UK,[3] for the UK and US armed forces. An improved version called the Advanced Performance Bangalore Torpedo (APBT) was developed by Chemring Energetics UK, part of the Chemring Group, in response to a British Ministry of Defence requirement issued in 2008; the APBT was chosen by the MOD following competitive performance trials and is also in use with the militaries of Australia, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.[4] They have been used during the Afghanistan War for actions such as clearing mines or razor wire

4

UK public now eating significantly less meat
Daily meat consumption in the UK has fallen by 17% in the last decade, a study has shown.








ANSWER
1-3 He ws worried someone would shoot him if he played outdoors

User avatar
Declan MacPherson
udonmap.com
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Joined: June 2, 2019, 5:59 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Declan MacPherson » October 13, 2021, 10:01 am

Doodoo wrote:
October 13, 2021, 9:23 am
https://theconservativetreehouse.com/bl ... in-august/
BLS Report – 4.3 Million US Workers Voluntarily Quit Their Jobs in August

SO????
* * *
I would say the same to you.

SO?

* * *
"Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil." - Ephesians 6:11

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