Yes it really happened

Post your thoughts here if you are not sure where to post it!
Post Reply
Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 26, 2020, 7:44 am

1) Yogi Berra won 13 World Series in 18 seasons with the Yanks. While, Babe Ruth only won four World Series in 15 seasons with the New York Yankees.

2) When asked why he didn’t win gold in cross country at the 2010 Olympics, Norwegian skier Odd-Bjoern Hjelmeset said, “I think I have seen too much porn in the last 14 days.”

3) China did not win an Olympic medal until 1984. At the 2008 Beijing games, the Chinese won 100 medals.

4) Around 25 billion pairs of waribashi (disposable chopsticks) are used in Japan each year. This is equivalent to the timber needed to build 17,000 homes

5) Japan is the largest automobile producer in the world, and the Japanese company Toyota is the third largest automaker in the world. It was founded by Kiichiro Toyoda who changed the “da” for “ta” because it sounds clearer. Also, written in Katakana script, “Toyota” uses 8 brush strokes, a number considered to be lucky in Japan



Kenr6583
udonmap.com
Posts: 538
Joined: July 13, 2019, 2:15 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Kenr6583 » January 26, 2020, 7:59 am

But the Babe did win three World Series Championships with the Red Sox. (I know that doesn't count)

User avatar
Earnest
udonmap.com
Posts: 1548
Joined: January 14, 2014, 3:56 am
Location: In bed with 747

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » January 26, 2020, 8:36 pm

Earnest wrote:
January 25, 2020, 10:26 pm
No point. :shock:

Just generating a bit of interest. 8-[
Khun Paul wrote:
January 26, 2020, 6:33 am
Really, historically you are a STIRRER, so leave it out , you naughty boy .
Don't be like that, KP, you have me all wrong. I checked out the waterproof mobile 'phone thing and found out there was some evidence.
กรรม

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 26, 2020, 8:58 pm

Bravo KP

Boo Hoo Eranest or whatever your name is

User avatar
Earnest
udonmap.com
Posts: 1548
Joined: January 14, 2014, 3:56 am
Location: In bed with 747

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Earnest » January 26, 2020, 9:03 pm

Earnest but you can call me Eranest if you like. :D

Have you any more facts for me to pore over, old chum?

Very enjoyable.
กรรม

User avatar
saint
udonmap.com
Posts: 3067
Joined: February 28, 2008, 5:31 pm
Location: the truth is out there . but dont dare tell it !!!!

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by saint » January 27, 2020, 4:43 am

I believe the first car Mr Toyoda made was a copy of the Austin 7 (ruby ) under licence .
As did Germanys BMW , which all three manufacturers helped cement the current driving controls format , first used by Cadillac .

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 27, 2020, 6:07 am

Cold weather myths

1) You lose most of your body heat through your head
Despite this being a well-circulated claim, just 10% of your body heat is lost from your head. A University of Manitoba study found that the head, which takes up just 7-9% of your body’s surface, does not contribute relatively more than the rest of the body to total body surface heat loss. However, keep that 7-9% warm when bundled up and wear a hat.
Dressing in layers keeps you warm
Adding another easy-to-carry layer to your no-fuss cardigan will not grant you immunity from the cold. Properly layering is a science. When done wrong, it will be ineffective. You will end up either too cold or too warm, stuck shivering or sweating. To properly layer, start with a thin, form-fitting item that can trap your body heat. Then add increasingly thick layers, focusing on retaining heat in your core. Mountain Warehouse recommends a microfleece or other thin insulated jacket as a second layer and a snow-, wind- and rain-resistant outer layer to top off the look. If layering is too much work, opt for one well-made coat. If properly made, it might be as effective as three layers.



2) You can catch a cold from the cold
There are over a billion colds in the U.S. every year. Kids infect other kids who infect their parents and teachers who infect other parents and teachers who infect other non-parents and non-teachers. A common cold is a virus. It spreads through the air an infected person releases and the contaminated surfaces they touch, not frigid temperatures.

3) Don’t exercise in the cold
Not only will the sunlight lift your mood, but you may also take to your workout easier. With no humidity and heat, it becomes extremely important that you layer properly to avoid excess sweat and moisture. So skip anything cotton. Regular exercise, for weight loss or otherwise, is also known to boost your immune system, a useful side-effect during the cold and flu season.

4) Don’t go out with wet hair, you’ll get sick
Remember, the common cold and the flu are viruses. They spread through the air and contaminated surfaces, not the cold. However, if exposed to cold air, wet hair can experience breakage

5) Frostbite takes a while to set in
The coldest inhabitable city in the world has an average temperature of minus 58 degrees F, but it does not need to be that cold out for frostbite to quickly kick in. Risk of frostbite increases when temperatures dip below 5 degrees Fahrenheit. When temperatures reach below zero, it takes 30 minutes of exposure for skin to experience frostbite. At 15 below, it takes only 15 minutes.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 28, 2020, 6:13 am

1) Vaccines and autism
Few false beliefs are as persistently harmful as the one that links autism to MMR vaccines. Based on a fraudulent, thoroughly discredited, and retracted paper published in 1998, anti-vax hysteria allowed diseases like measles—once virtually wiped out in developed countries—to resurge around the world, causing 140,000 deaths in 2018 alone. That mistrust has spread to other life-saving immunizations for illnesses like the flu, which causes an estimated 650,000 deaths worldwide each year.

2) Cancer-free sharks
Shark populations have plunged since the myth that shark cartilage can prevent or cure cancer became widespread (though shark fin soup also plays a part), but it’s founded on the mistaken belief that sharks don’t get cancer. In fact, sharks can and do get cancer, though at low rates. Recent research reveals that sharks have very stable genomes, and unlocking the key to that stability could provide new ways to fight a variety of age-related diseases, including cancer—that is, if sharks don’t become extinct before then.

3) Sugar in the gas tank
Dumping a bag of sugar in your enemy’s gas tank has long been considered a cheap and effective way to ruin that person’s day. But it turns out that, instead of turning the gasoline into simple syrup and gumming up the works with hard candy, as popularly imagined, the sugar would just clog the filter, at worst. The reason? Sugar doesn’t dissolve in gasoline.

4) Rechargeable batteries
There’s no such thing as a rechargeable battery. More specifically, batteries don’t store a charge in the first place: they store energy. Simply put, the energy in your phone, for instance, comes from chemical reactions inside the battery. “Recharging” is actually reversing that chemical reaction so it can happen all over again. To be fair, it’s a question of terminology more than anything. Reversible batteries, anyone?

5) The Earth’s atmosphere is composed mainly of nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%), argon (.93%),

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 29, 2020, 5:52 am

1) Mexico – 41.2 hrs/week (The most hours of work per week)
Mexico is the hardest-working OECD nation in the world, with the average working week lasting 41.2 hours in 2018. Working hours are generally around 8am until 6pm but these are decided by the employer since there are fairly lax labor laws in Mexico. However, there may be a change coming with new leader Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who was voted in back in July 2018.

2) Germany – 26.1 hrs/week (The least hours of work per week)
The fact that Germany had an average working week of 26.1 hours in 2018 is fitting considering recent events. In early 2018, a German union won the right to a 28-hour working week, alongside a 4.3% pay rise. While the 26.1 average is likely influenced by a workforce that is made up of 22% part-time workers, according to World Atlas, it underlines that the Germans are serious about their work-life balance.

3) Cheapest place to live worldwide Cambodia
Cheapest Places to Live in the World in 2020 - International Living

4) The most expensive place to live in the world
Hong Kong, China — The 10 most expensive cities to live in around the world in 2018

5) The Dumbest Country in the World
Chad
Topping our list of 25 dumbest countries in the world is Chad. Chad is considered the least technologically advanced states in the world and also the top 8th when it comes to countries with least number of individual using Internet.
https://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/25-d ... 375615/25/

Kenr6583
udonmap.com
Posts: 538
Joined: July 13, 2019, 2:15 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Kenr6583 » January 29, 2020, 6:03 am

3) stay that way for the next year-and-a-half and beyond

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 30, 2020, 5:44 am

100 years Ago
1) Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is formed
A 1919 legislation merging Dominion Police with the Royal North-West Mounted Police came into force on Feb. 1, 1920. The new force was named the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) with its headquarters in Ottawa. The central police force is today tasked with a wide range of responsibilities, including VIP protection, national security and economic offences.


2) Debut of Olympic symbol
The symbol, featuring colorful interlaced rings, was first displayed at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium, held between April 20 and Sept. 12. It was designed by the founder of modern Olympics Pierre de Coubertin. According to Olympic Charter, the symbol “represents the union of five continents and the meeting of athletes from throughout the world at the Olympic Games.”

3) Oxford University allows women to receive degrees
From the late 1870s, women took lectures and sat for examinations at the Oxford University in England. However, they were not allowed to claim degrees as they were not admitted to become university members. It was only after the passing of a statute on Oct. 7, 1920, that allowed women to become full members and graduates.

4) First commercial radio station begins operations
On Nov. 2, 1920, Westinghouse company’s KDKA radio station made the first commercial radio broadcast from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. It aired the results of that year’s presidential election. By the end of 1921, around eight radio stations had started broadcasting in the country.

5) Qantas Airways is founded
On Nov. 16, 1920, the Australian airliner was founded by Hudson Fysh and Paul McGinness as Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Ltd. (QANTAS) at Winton, Queensland. Its first scheduled mail and passenger flights started from Charleville to Cloncurry in November 1922. Later, the carrier was renamed to Qantas Airways Limited in 1967.

6) First four-way, three-colored traffic light becomes operational
In 1920, Detroit police officer William Potts added the color amber (to signal “caution” to drivers) to the already in use red-green system. The modern day three-colored traffic lights and four-way invention was first installed at the Woodward Avenue and Fort Street in the Detroit, Michigan, U.S.

7) Haribo is founded
The popular German confectionery company was founded by Hans Riegel in Bonn on Dec. 13, 1920. The company is known for its iconic treats such as gummy candies “Dancing Bear” and the “Gold-Bear.”

User avatar
Drunk Monkey
udonmap.com
Posts: 3999
Joined: October 14, 2013, 4:39 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Drunk Monkey » January 30, 2020, 8:08 am

Could only happen in Grimsby .. basically shop lifter with broken legs ..legs it from.police ..ON A MOBILITY SCOOTER

https://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/news ... er-3791564

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 31, 2020, 5:25 am

1) North Korea and Cuba are the only places you can't buy Coca-Cola.
No matter where you go, it's comforting to know you can always enjoy a Coca-Cola. Well, almost. While this fizzy drink is sold practically everywhere, it still hasn't (officially) made its way to North Korea or Cuba, according to the BBC. That's because these countries are under long-term U.S. trade embargoes.

2) There are more twins now than ever before.
You might think twins are a rarity, but they're actually becoming more common than ever. "From about 1915, when the statistical record begins, until 1980, about one in every 50 babies born was a twin, a rate of 2 percent," writes Alexis C. Madrigal of The Atlantic. "Then, the rate began to increase: by 1995, it was 2.5 percent. The rate surpassed 3 percent in 2001 and hit 3.3 percent in 2010. [That means] one out of every 30 babies born is a twin."

Scientists believe this trend is due to the fact that older women tend to have more twins, and women are choosing to start families later. Fertility treatments such as in-vitro fertilization likely also play a role.

3) The hottest chili pepper in the world is so hot it could kill you.
The "weapons-grade" Dragon's Breath chili pepper is so hot it's downright deadly. If you ate one, it could potentially cause a type of anaphylactic shock, burning the airways and closing them up. "I've tried it on the tip of my tongue and it just burned and burned," said Mike Smith, the hobby grower who invented the Dragon's Breath along with scientists from Nottingham University. So why make such an impractical pepper? It turns out, the chili was developed to be used in medical treatment as an anesthetic that can numb the skin.

4) The Canary Islands are named after dogs, not birds.
It might seem safe to assume that the Canary Islands were named after canary birds, but the location was actually named after dogs. Although it's off the coast of northwestern Africa, the archipelago is actually part of Spain. In Spanish, the area's name is Islas Canarias which comes from the Latin phrase Canariae Insulae or "island of dogs."

5) Indonesia is home to some of the shortest people in the world.
There are short people and tall people everywhere, but Indonesia is home to some of the shortest people in the world, according to data compiled from various global sources by the Telegraph in 2017. When taking both genders into account, the average adult is around 5 feet, 1.8 inches. People in Bolivia don't tend to be much taller, with an average adult height of 5 feet, 2.4 inches. The tallest people among us live in the Netherlands, where the average adult height is 6 feet.

User avatar
newtovillagelife
udonmap.com
Posts: 1231
Joined: December 3, 2011, 10:14 am

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by newtovillagelife » January 31, 2020, 8:15 am

Who needs GOOGLE when we have DOODOO!!!!

AKA...Mr. COPY AND PASTE.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » January 31, 2020, 8:37 am

Sorry but its
Mr Copy CUT and Paste

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 1, 2020, 7:02 am

1) The longest place name on the planet is 85 letters long.
People who live in Mamungkukumpurangkuntjunya Hill, Australia, need a little patience when it comes to learning to spell their hometown's name. But you know what? So do the folks from Lake Chargoggagoggman-chauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg in Massachusetts and Tweebuffelsmeteen-skootmorsdoodgeskietfontein, South Africa. But none of them have quite as much work to do when jotting down their address as those who live in Taumatawhakatangihanga-koauauotamateaturipukakapikimaung-ahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu, New Zealand, which, with 85 letters, is the longest place name in the world.

2) Japan is the world's most earthquake-prone country.
Earthquakes can range from minor tremors that are barely noticeable to building-toppling ground-shakers that cause massive destruction. But it's an inevitable part of life for those who live in countries such as China, Indonesia, Iran, and Turkey, which are some of the most earthquake-prone places on the planet. However, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, Japan records the most earthquakes in the world.

3) Africa and Asia are home to nearly 90 percent of the world's rural population.
Not everyone lives in a booming city or sprawling suburb. Many people still make their homes outside of bustling locations, especially in India, which has the largest number of people living in rural areas (approximately 893 million people live outside of the city), according to Reuters China also has an impressively large rural population, with 578 million living outside of major centers.

4) People 60 years and older make up 12.3 percent of the global population.
Although the majority of the human population is currently under 30 years old, there are still plenty of older folks among us. In fact, 12.3 percent of people on Earth are 60 years old and older. That number is expected to reach 22 percent by 2050.

5) There are 43 countries that still have a royal family.
The British royal family may be the most famous royal family on the planet, but there are still plenty of other nobles out there. In total, there are 28 royal families who rule over a total of 43 countries around the world, including Japan, Spain, Swaziland, Bhutan, Thailand, Monaco, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Liechtenstein.

User avatar
Udon Map
Admin
Posts: 1724
Joined: July 31, 2013, 7:57 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » February 1, 2020, 11:55 am

Doodoo wrote:
February 1, 2020, 7:02 am
1) The longest place name on the planet is 85 letters long. People who live in Mamungkukumpurangkuntjunya Hill, Australia, need a little patience when it comes to learning to spell their hometown's name. But you know what? So do the folks from Lake Chargoggagoggman-chauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg in Massachusetts and Tweebuffelsmeteen-skootmorsdoodgeskietfontein, South Africa. But none of them have quite as much work to do when jotting down their address as those who live in Taumatawhakatangihanga-koauauotamateaturipukakapikimaung-ahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu, New Zealand, which, with 85 letters, is the longest place name in the world.
What about Bangkok's name?
Krungthepmahanakhon Amonrattanakosin Mahintharayutthaya Mahadilokphop Noppharatratchathaniburirom Udomratchaniwetmahasathan Amonphimanawatansathit Sakkathattiyawitsanukamprasit

User avatar
Sateeb
udonmap.com
Posts: 361
Joined: June 15, 2016, 10:58 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Sateeb » February 1, 2020, 4:37 pm

newtovillagelife wrote:
January 31, 2020, 8:15 am
Who needs GOOGLE when we have DOODOO!!!!

AKA...Mr. COPY AND PASTE.
I like reading his posts. It's stuff I normally wouldn't go looking for. Easier on the eye than your quote inside a quote inside a quote inside a quote that's wearing the skin off of my fingertip.
"Don't believe everything you read on the Internet." - Gandhi.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1950
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 1, 2020, 6:11 pm

Sateeb

Thank you for the input

pal52
udonmap.com
Posts: 840
Joined: September 18, 2013, 10:54 am

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by pal52 » February 1, 2020, 6:43 pm

Doodoo wrote:
February 1, 2020, 6:11 pm
Sateeb

Thank you for the input
I enjoy reading your posts.
You might be a mine of useless information but it certainly makes for great reading.
Keep on posting

Post Reply

Return to “Open Forum”