Yes it really happened

Post your thoughts here if you are not sure where to post it!
Post Reply
Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 7, 2021, 7:16 am

1
The Grumman TBF Avenger (designated TBM for aircraft manufactured by General Motors) is an American torpedo bomber developed initially for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, and eventually used by several air and naval aviation services around the world.

The Avenger entered U.S. service in 1942, and first saw action during the Battle of Midway. Despite the loss of five of the six Avengers on its combat debut, it survived in service to become the most effective[1] and widely-used torpedo bomber of World War II, sharing credit for sinking the super-battleships Yamato and Musashi (the only ships of that type sunk exclusively by American aircraft while under way) and being credited for sinking 30 submarines. Greatly modified after the war, it remained in use until the 1960s.[2]

2

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Blair "Paddy" Mayne, DSO & Three Bars (11 January 1915 – 14 December 1955) was a British Army soldier from Newtownards, capped for Ireland and the British Lions at rugby union, lawyer, amateur boxer and a founding member of the Special Air Service (SAS).

During the course of the Second World War he became one of the British Army's most highly decorated soldiers and, by destroying 47 aircraft in a single action, he may well have destroyed more German aircraft than the RAF's highest scoring ace.[1] He was controversially denied a Victoria Cross.



3

Absinthe (/ˈæbsɪnθ, -sæ̃θ/, French: [apsɛ̃t] (About this soundlisten)) is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic beverage (45–74% ABV / 90–148 U.S. proof).[1][2][3][4] It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium ("grand wormwood"), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs.[5]

Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but may also be colorless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as la fée verte ("the green fairy"). It is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, but is not traditionally bottled with added sugar and is, therefore, classified as a spirit.[6] Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water before being consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It rose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. The consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists, partly due to its association with bohemian culture. From Europe and the Americas, notable absinthe drinkers included Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Marcel Proust, Aleister Crowley, Erik Satie, Edgar Allan Poe, Lord Byron and Alfred Jarry.[7][8]

Absinthe has often been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug and hallucinogen.[9] The chemical compound thujone, which is present in the spirit in trace amounts, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in much of Europe, including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria–Hungary, yet it has not been demonstrated to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Recent studies have shown that absinthe's psychoactive properties have been exaggerated, apart from that of the alcohol.[9]

A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, following the adoption of modern European Union food and beverage laws that removed long-standing barriers to its production and sale. By the early 21st century, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, and the Czech Republic.



User avatar
papafarang
udonmap.com
Posts: 3228
Joined: August 2, 2013, 10:14 am

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by papafarang » February 7, 2021, 7:59 am

Absinthe , now that does bring back bad memories. I once drank half a bottle . the ensuing bike açcident nearly cost me a leg. And that's while parked on my drive . never again :lol:
Hansa village clubhouse . Tel 0981657001 https://www.google.co.th/maps/place/Han ... 5851?hl=en

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 8, 2021, 3:01 am

1

André René Roussimoff (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993), better known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler and actor.

Roussimoff stood around seven feet tall, which was a result of gigantism caused by excess growth hormone, and later resulted in acromegaly. It also led to him being called "The Eighth Wonder of the World".] He found success as a fan favorite throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, appearing as an attraction for various professional wrestling promotions. During the 1980s wrestling boom, he was paired with the villainous manager Bobby Heenan and feuded with Hulk Hogan in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE). The two headlined WrestleMania III in 1987, and in 1988, he defeated Hogan to win the WWF World Heavyweight Championship, his sole world heavyweight championship, on the first episode of The Main Event. He also held the WWF Tag Team Championship before failing health forced him to retire in 1992.

Outside of wrestling, he was best known for appearing as Fezzik the giant in The Princess Bride.[3] After his death in 1993, he became the inaugural inductee into the newly created WWF Hall of Fame. He was later a charter member of the Wrestling Observer Newsletter Hall of Fame and the Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame; the latter describes him as being "one of the most recognizable figures in the world both as a professional wrestler and as a pop culture icon.

2

Pepper was born the youngest of three boys in Campbell River, British Columbia, the son of a lumberjack.[2] When he was five years old, his family set sail in a homemade ship, navigating through the South Pacific islands for five years.[2][3] His education was completed in both public schools and correspondence courses. Due to the lack of television as entertainment, the family created and performed sketches for each other. When the family had finished their travels, they returned to Canada and set up a shop on Denman Island.

Barry Pepper is perhaps best known for his role as the sniper Private Daniel Jackson in Saving Private Ryan. He portrayed Corrections Officer Dean Stanton in The Green Mile, appeared as Frank Slaughtery in Spike Lee's 25th Hour, as journalist Joseph L. Galloway in We Were Soldiers, his role as the heroic antagonist of the film Battlefield Earth, his depiction of Roger Maris in Billy Crystal's HBO film 61*, as Dale Earnhardt in the ESPN produced film 3: The Dale Earnhardt Story, and as Dan Morris in the film Seven Pounds, with Will Smith. He recently had roles in Casino Jack and the Coen brothers' True Grit. Pepper provided the voice for Alex Mercer, the protagonist of the video game Prototype and the voice for Corporal Dunn, a character in the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.
Pepper won the Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actor for his performance in Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000. He has stated that, had he known in advance he was going to win the award, he would have gladly accepted it in person.[4] He also appeared in Jagged Edge's music video for "Goodbye". In 2011, he starred as Robert F. Kennedy in the Canadian-American TV mini-series The Kennedys, for which he won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie.

In 2015, Pepper appeared in The Maze Runner sequel, Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, as Vince, "a survivalist who is one of the last remaining soldiers of a legendary unit called the Right Arm".[5] Filming began at the end of October 2014, and the movie was released on September 18, 2015.

In 2018, Pepper reprised his role as Vince in Maze Runner: The Death Cure.

In 2019, Pepper starred as David Keller in Crawl.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 9, 2021, 12:02 am

1
Exceptional Women Of The Battle Of Britain
The bravery of three World War Two servicewomen - whose determination to continue their vital work while bombs exploded around them during the Battle Of Britain - has been praised as an inspiration to today's Royal Air Force personnel.

The decisive actions of the members of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF), Sergeant Joan Mortimer, Flight Officer Elspeth Henderson and Sergeant Helen Turner, have been held up as an example to those serving in today's air force.

They are said to have refused to let anything stop them from carrying out their vital work in helping bring Hitler's Luftwaffe to its knees.
From July until October 1940, Hitler's air force tried to dominate the skies above Britain. Pilots of many nations united against a cunning and conniving foe. A fierce enemy that fought hard.

What Hitler had not bargained on was the fighting spirit of those left on the ground.
The Battle Of Britain was not only won in the air, but by the incredible efforts of servicemen and some exceptional service women who played their part in bringing about victory.

BFBS Radio asked Corporal Keats to retell the courageous story of Joan, Elspeth and Helen - three women who inspire and motivate her today, eight decades after the infamous Battle Of Britain.

During the fierce battle in the skies above Britain, fought by men who were collectively known as ‘The Few’, Hitler’s air forces were relentless in bombing RAF stations to try and slow down the capability of the Royal Air Force.

Sgt Joan Mortimer, Fg Off Elspeth Henderson and Sgt Helen Turner all worked as teleprinter operators at RAF Biggin Hill, a station pinpointed by the Luftwaffe.

Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill called Biggin Hill, one of Britain's oldest aerodromes, his “strongest link” - a base from where pilots shot down 1,400 Luftwaffe aircraft.

Jemma Davey, Director of the Biggin Hill War Memorial Museum, explained to Forces News in January 2019 that not only was Biggin Hill instrumental to the development of wireless communication technologies but ...

"Instrumental in the turning point of Second World War."

On August 31, 1940, the relentless bombings at Biggin Hill killed dozens of people.
The next day, the seemingly fearless women were back at work while the constant bombing continued.

As Elspeth worked to keep in touch with Fighter Command at Uxbridge, she was blown off her feet by a direct hit to the ops room. But, once she had dusted herself down, she returned to her work.

Helen was operating the switchboard while the building was repeatedly hit but she also carried on, only leaving her post when a fire broke out and all personnel were ordered out of the building.
Joan was working at the armoury relaying messages throughout the raid.

The only time she stopped was to run outside and mark unexploded bombs with red flags. All the time, bombs detonated around her.

Speaking of the influence these three women, and others like them, have had on Cpl Keats’ career, she said:

“I cannot imagine how terrifying these conditions must have been and quite rightly each lady received a military medal for th

The courageous women were awarded Military Medals for their actions on that dark day during the Battle Of Britain.

The official citation for Sgt Joan Mortimer’s medal reads:

“This airwoman displayed exceptional courage and coolness which had a great moral effect on all those with whom she came in contact."

Sgt Mortimer was presented her Military Medal by His Majesty individual George VI at Buckingham Palace in March 1941.

However, not everyone at the time was pleased with the women being honoured in this way.
The Biggin Hill Memorial Museum spoke to Elspeth’s daughter Heather Redfearn in February 2020 about her Mother’s bravery.

She revealed there was controversy around the medal presentation. Elspeth, Joan and Helen were the first RAF women to receive the Military Medal which did not sit well with everyone. She said:

“It caused a bit of a stir at the time, that these women were being awarded a ‘man's medal’.

“It was awarded for bravery for, in her case, staying at her post during a raid when the operations room where she was based suffered a direct hit.”

2
James Anthony Abbott (born September 19, 1967) is an American former baseball pitcher. He is known for his success at the major league level despite having been born without a right hand. Abbott played ten seasons in Major League Baseball for the California Angels, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, and Milwaukee Brewers, from 1989 to 1999.

Abbott graduated from Flint Central High School and grew up in the East Village area of Flint, Michigan. While with the University of Michigan, he won the James E. Sullivan Award as the nation's best amateur athlete in 1987 and won a gold medal in the demonstration event at the 1988 Summer Olympics. He was drafted in the first round of the 1988 MLB draft and reached the major leagues the next year. As a member of the Yankees, he threw a no-hitter against the Cleveland Indians in 1993.[1] Abbott retired with a career record of 87 wins and 108 losses, along with a 4.25 earned run average. He currently works as a motivational speake

Playing with one hand[edit]
When preparing to pitch the ball, Abbott would rest his glove on the end of his right forearm. After releasing the ball, he would quickly slip his hand into the glove, usually in time to field any balls that a two-handed pitcher would be able to field. Then he would secure the glove between his right forearm and torso, slip his hand out of the glove, and remove the ball from the glove, usually in time to throw out the runner at first or sometimes even start a double play. At all levels, teams tried to exploit his fielding disadvantage by repeatedly bunting to him.[7]

Batting was not an issue for Abbott for the majority of his career, since the American League uses the designated hitter, and he played only two seasons in the interleague play era. But Abbott tripled in a spring training game in 1991 off Rick Reuschel,[8] and when Abbott joined the National League's Milwaukee Brewers in 1999, he had two hits in 21 at-bats, both off Jon Lieber.[9][10] New York Yankees teammate Mariano Rivera claimed to have witnessed Abbott hitting home runs during batting practice.[11]

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 10, 2021, 2:35 am

1

Underground nuclear bunker, Norfolk, UK: $32,600 (£25k)
Constructed in 1961, this bunker for sale is one of some 1,560 underground hideouts built in the UK in response to the nuclear threat posed during the Cold War. This one listed on Unique Property Bulletin, near the village of Brundall in Norfolk, survived the defence cutbacks of the mid-60s, which saw over half of the bunkers closed, with many subsequently demolished.

The bunker follows the standard government design of the time, with the structure cast out of one solid piece of steel-reinforced concrete. In the event of a shockwave from a nearby nuclear attack, the self-contained unit would be able to absorb the impact, rather than fracturing and crumbling. The structure was updated with extra insulation in the 1980s and again in 2002 when it was selected as a radio monitoring station due to its elevation.
The bunker sits around 16 feet below the ground – inside there's a main monitoring room and a separate small bathroom, while electricity is provided via a generator and batteries. If you're interested in a historic restoration project, you’ll be delighted to discover genuine period artefacts, including radiation-measuring instruments, a rare Teletalk communication set and original RAF mattresses, are available to purchase by separate negotiation.

2

On February 2, 1887, Groundhog Day, featuring a rodent meteorologist, is celebrated for the first time at Gobbler’s jerk in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. According to tradition, if a groundhog comes out of its hole on this day and sees its shadow, it gets scared and runs back into its burrow, predicting six more weeks of winter weather; no shadow means an early spring.Groundhog Day has its roots in the ancient Christian tradition of Candlemas, when clergy would bless and distribute candles needed for winter. The candles represented how long and cold the winter would be. Germans expanded on this concept by selecting an animal—the hedgehog—as a means of predicting weather. Once they came to America, German settlers in Pennsylvania continued the tradition, although they switched from hedgehogs to groundhogs, which were plentiful in the Keystone State.
Groundhogs, also called woodchucks and whose scientific name is Marmota monax, typically weigh 12 to 15 pounds and live six to eight years. They eat vegetables and fruits, whistle when they’re frightened or looking for a mate (they’re sometimes called whistle pigs) and can climb trees and swim.
They go into hibernation in the late fall; during this time, their body temperatures drop significantly, their heartbeats slow from 80 to five beats per minute and they can lose 30 percent of their body fat. In February, male groundhogs emerge from their burrows to look for a mate (not to predict the weather) before going underground again. They come out of hibernation for good in March.
In 1887, a newspaper editor belonging to a group of groundhog hunters from Punxsutawney called the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club declared that Phil, the Punxsutawney groundhog, was America’s only true weather-forecasting groundhog. The line of groundhogs that have since been known as Phil might be America’s most famous groundhogs, but other towns across North America now have their own weather-predicting rodents, from Birmingham Bill to Staten Island Chuck to Shubenacadie Sam in Canada.
In 1993, the movie Groundhog Day starring Bill Murray popularized the usage of “groundhog day” to mean something that is repeated over and over. Today, tens of thousands of people converge on Gobbler’s jerk in Punxsutawney each February 2 to witness Phil’s prediction. The Punxsutawney Groundhog Club hosts a three-day celebration featuring entertainment and activities.

Or you have Wiarton, Ontario Willie for Canada

Wiarton Willie is the name given to a Canadian groundhog who lives in the community of Wiarton in Bruce County, Ontario. Every February 2, on Groundhog Day, Willie takes part in the local Wiarton Willie Festival. His role is to predict whether there will be an early spring. Wiartons Groundhog Day celebrations continue each year with a successor of the original Willie, and each successor is also referred to as Wiarton Willie.

Groundhog Day, featuring Wiarton Willie, is a popular annual festival in Wiarton and is similar to events in other locations in North America. A midwinter celebration involving an animal with predictive powers was an element of Celtic culture.[1] The link between weather prediction and the day is said to have been inspired by an old Scottish couplet: "If Candlemas Day is bright and clear/ There'll be two winters in the year."
The story of Wiarton Willie dates back to 1956. A Wiarton resident named Mac McKenzie wanted to showcase his childhood home to his many friends, so he sent out invitations for a "Groundhog Day" gathering. One of these invitations fell into the hands of a Toronto Star reporter. The reporter travelled to Wiarton looking for the Groundhog Day event. None of the townspeople knew about a festival, but one suggested he check at the Arlington Hotel, the local watering hole. There the reporter found McKenzie and his friends partying and was invited to join them. The next day, the reporter lamented to McKenzie that he needed some kind of story to take back to justify his expenses. So McKenzie grabbed his wife's fur hat, which had a large button on the front, went out to the parking lot, dug a burrow in the snow and pronounced a prognostication (which no one remembers). The picture of Mac and the hat ran in the February 3, 1956 edition of the Toronto Star. A year later, about 50 people arrived for the festival. Half were reporters from various media, including the CBC and Canadian Press. Seizing on the opportunity, McKenzie invented a festival that has been added to over the years.[3]

Wiarton Willie himself is a more recent addition to the festivities. In the early years, prognostication was provided by the "mythical" trio of groundhogs Grundoon, Muldoon and Sand Dune. Willie appeared on the scene in the 1980s. Wiarton Willie's predictive powers are attributed (by his followers) to his situation on the 45th parallel, exactly halfway between the Equator and the North Pole. He is claimed locally to be accurate in his prognostications around 90% of the time;[2] scientists have estimated Willie's accuracy at 25%.[4]

The original Wiarton Willie lived to the advanced age of 22, and was found dead only two days before Groundhog Day in 1999. The organizers were unable to find a replacement, and instead marked Groundhog Day by revealing "Willie" in a coffin. He had been dressed in a tuxedo, had coins over his eyes, and a carrot between his paws. The real Willie had in fact decomposed, and the body in the coffin was that of an older, stuffed groundhog. The Associated Press was obliged to issue a retraction on its wires.
Wiarton Willie's keepers groom understudies, nicknamed "Wee Willie" during the elder groundhog's lifetime, to eventually replace the reigning Wiarton Willie when they die. Wiarton Willies have typically had lifespans longer than the 4–9 years of a typical groundhog,[6] and thus other groundhogs may have served in the role unreported. Wiarton Willie II was reported as deceased on July 11, 2006 after fighting an infection for the previous month.

On September 15, 2017, Wiarton Willie III died at 13. Two-year-old Wee Willie became Wiarton Willie IV on September 30, 2017, coinciding with a memorial service for the old Willie

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 11, 2021, 1:52 am

1

MASH 4077
Amount paid for Walter "Radar" O'Reily's Teddy Bear in 2005 $11,500


2

Michel Ray de Carvalho is a British financier, former Olympic skier and luger, and former child actor in films such as The Brave One, The Tin Star, and Lawrence of Arabia (under the name Michel Ray). Born in Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, his father was a Brazilian diplomat and his mother was British
De Carvalho appeared in several films as a child and teenager, including the 1962 epic film Lawrence of Arabia (where he played the character Farraj), The Divided Heart in 1954 and The Brave One in 1956 where he plays a young Mexican boy who tries to rescue his pet bull from being killed by a champion bullfighter.[2][3]

He quit acting to attend Harvard University, which he later described as "just about the most stupid decision" he ever made.[4] Nevertheless, de Carvalho graduated from Harvard and then earned an MBA degree from the same university.[5]

De Carvalho represented Great Britain at the 1968 Winter Olympics in skiing, and luge at the 1972 and 1976 Winter Olympics.[1] In May 2013 he was named President of British Skeleton

3
T.E. Lawrence
Many complaints about the film's accuracy concern the characterisation of Lawrence. The perceived problems with the portrayal begin with the differences in his physical appearance; the 6-foot-2-inch (1.88 m) Peter O'Toole was almost 9 inches (23 cm) taller than the 5-foot-5-inch (1.65 m) Lawrence.[27] His behaviour, however, has caused much more debate.

The screenwriters depict Lawrence as an egotist. It is not clear to what degree Lawrence sought or shunned attention, as evidenced by his use of various assumed names after the war. Even during the war, Lowell Thomas wrote in With Lawrence in Arabia that he could take pictures of him only by tricking him, but Lawrence later agreed to pose for several photos for Thomas's stage show. Thomas's famous comment that Lawrence "had a genius for backing into the limelight" can be taken to suggest that his extraordinary actions prevented him from being as private as he would have liked, or it can be taken to suggest that Lawrence made a pretence of avoiding the limelight but subtly placed himself at centre stage. Others point to Lawrence's own writings to support the argument that he was egotistical.

Lawrence's sexual orientation remains a controversial topic among historians. Bolt's primary source was ostensibly Seven Pillars, but the film's portrayal seems informed by Richard Aldington's Biographical Inquiry (1955), which posited Lawrence as a "pathological liar and exhibitionist" as well as a homosexual. That is opposed to his portrayal in Ross as "physically and spiritually recluse".[28] Historians such as Basil Liddell Hart disputed the film's depiction of Lawrence as an active participant in the attack and slaughter of the retreating Turkish columns who had committed the Tafas massacre, but most current biographers accept the film's portrayal as reasonably accurate.

The film shows that Lawrence spoke and read Arabic, could quote the Quran, and was reasonably knowledgeable about the region. It barely mentions his archaeological travels from 1911 to 1914 in Syria and Arabia and ignores his espionage work, including a prewar topographical survey of the Sinai Peninsula and his attempts to negotiate the release of British prisoners at Kut, Mesopotamia, in 1916. Furthermore, Lawrence is made aware of the Sykes–Picot Agreement very late in the story and is shown to be appalled by it, but he may well have known about it much earlier while he fought alongside the Arabs.[29]

Lawrence's biographers have a mixed reaction towards the film. The authorised biographer Jeremy Wilson noted that the film has "undoubtedly influenced the perceptions of some subsequent biographers", such as the depiction of the film's Ali being real, rather than a composite character, and also the highlighting the Deraa incident.[30] The film's historical inaccuracies, in Wilson's view, are more troublesome than should be allowed under normal dramatic licence. At the time, Liddell Hart publicly criticised the film and engaged Bolt in a lengthy correspondence over its portrayal of Lawrence.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 12, 2021, 6:49 am

1

USS Monitor was an ironclad warship built for the Union Navy during the American Civil War and completed in early 1862, the first such ship commissioned by the Navy.[a] Monitor played a central role in the Battle of Hampton Roads on 9 March under the command of Lieutenant John L. Worden, where she fought the casemate ironclad CSS Virginia (built on the hull of the scuttled steam frigate USS Merrimack) to a standstill. The design of the ship was distinguished by its revolving turret, which was designed by American inventor Theodore Timby; it was quickly duplicated and established the monitor class and type of armored warship built for the American Navy over the next several decades.


The remainder of the ship was designed by Swedish-born engineer and inventor John Ericsson, and built in only 101 days in Brooklyn, New York on the East River beginning in late 1861. Monitor presented a new concept in ship design and employed a variety of new inventions and innovations in ship building that caught the attention of the world. The impetus to build Monitor was prompted by the news that the Confederates were building an iron-plated armored vessel named the Virginia in the old Federal naval shipyard at Gosport, near Norfolk, that could effectively engage the Union ships blockading Hampton Roads harbor and the James River leading northwest to Richmond (capital of the Confederacy). They could ultimately advance unchallenged on Washington, D.C., up the Potomac River and other seacoast cities. Before Monitor could reach Hampton Roads, the Confederate ironclad had already destroyed the sail frigates USS Cumberland and USS Congress and had run the steam frigate USS Minnesota aground. That night, Monitor arrived and, just as Virginia set to finish off Minnesota and St. Lawrence on the second day, the new Union ironclad confronted the Confederate ship, preventing her from wreaking further destruction on the wooden Union ships. A four-hour battle ensued, each ship pounding the other with close-range cannon fire, although neither ship could destroy or seriously damage the other. This was the first battle fought between armored warships and marked a turning point in naval warfare.

The Confederates were forced to scuttle and destroy Virginia as they withdrew in early May 1862 from Norfolk and its naval shipyard, while Monitor sailed up the James River to support the Union Army during the Peninsula Campaign under General-in-Chief George B. McClellan. The ship participated in the Battle of Drewry's Bluff later that month, and remained in the area giving support to General McClellan's forces on land until she was ordered to join the Union Navy blockaders off North Carolina in December. On her way there, she foundered while under tow during a storm off Cape Hatteras on the last day of the year. Monitor's wreck was discovered in 1973 and has been partially salvaged. Her guns, gun turret, engine, and other relics are on display at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News, Virginia, a few miles from the site of its most important military action.


2

Ride Lightning.
When pilots soar through the skies they typically don’t pay much mind to the clouds. Sure these clouds can restrict vision or cause issues at times but generally, they don’t endanger the pilots. However, there is one monumental story of a pilot ejecting into a cloud that nearly took his life.

In 1959 Lieutenant Colonel William Rankin was conducting a routine flight exercise in his F-8 Crusader. Weather conditions turned harsh and in a twist of fate Rankin’s F-8 suffered an engine malfunction. He was forced to eject at high altitude into the clouds but this was only the beginning of his problems.

Lieutenant Colonel Rankin ejected nine miles above the surface of the earth and his lack of a pressure suit began to take a toll on his body. Blood began to pour from his nose, eyes and his abdomen began to swell. As he his descent into a cumulonimbus cloud and lightning burst all around him. His parachute deployed but strong wents into the storm cloud thrust him up over and over again. He was beaten with hailstones and the rain was so heavy he nearly drowned.

“At one point, I got seasick and heaved.”

– Lieutenant Colonel William Rankin

Eventually, Rankin found his way out of the cloud, fell to the earth and became tangled in some trees. His descent through the massive storm lasted 40 minutes. He was taken to the hospital and spent weeks in recovering from frostbite, decompression and injuries from the storm.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 13, 2021, 7:06 am

1

Notgeld (German for "emergency money" or "necessity money") refers to money issued by an institution in a time of economic or political crisis. The issuing institution is usually one without official sanction from the central government. This occurs usually when sufficient state-produced money is not available from the central bank. Most notably, notgeld generally refers to money produced in Germany and Austria during World War I and the Interbellum. Issuing institutions could be a town's savings banks, municipality and private or state-owned firms. Nearly all issues contained an expiry date, after which time they were invalid. Issues without dates ordinarily had an expiry announced in a newspaper or at the place of issuance.

Notgeld was mainly issued in the form of (paper) banknotes. Sometimes other forms were used, as well: coins, leather, silk, linen, wood, postage stamps, aluminium foil, coal, and porcelain; there are also reports of elemental sulfur being used, as well as all sorts of re-used paper and carton material (e.g. playing cards). These pieces made from playing cards are extremely rare and are known as Spielkarten, the German word for "playing card".

Notgeld was a mutually-accepted means of payment in a particular region or locality, but notes could travel widely. Some cases of Notgeld could better be defined as scrip, which were essentially coupons redeemable only at specific businesses. However, the immense volume of issues produced by innumerable municipalities, firms, businesses, and individuals across Germany blurred the definition. Collectors tend to categorize by region or era rather than issuing authority (see below). Notgeld is different from occupation money that is issued by an occupying army during a war.


2

Casa Loma (Spanish for "Hill House") is a Gothic Revival style mansion and garden in midtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that is now a historic house museum and landmark. It was constructed from 1911 to 1914 as a residence for financier Sir Henry Pellatt. The architect was E. J. Lennox,[1] who designed several other city landmarks. Casa Loma sits at an elevation of 140 metres (460 ft) above sea level.[2]

Due to its unique architectural character in Toronto, Casa Loma has been a popular filming location for movies and television. It is also a popular venue for wedding ceremonies,[3] and Casa Loma can be rented in the evenings after the museum closes to the public.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa_Loma

3

CN Tower Walkway (not in a million years will you catch me up there)

https://www.cntower.ca/en-ca/plan-your- ... rview.html

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 14, 2021, 7:33 am

1

Always peel potatoes
Potato skin is a great source of nutrients and fibre. The skin also adds texture and colour, so there’s little reason to peel. All skins need is a wash to remove the dirt then a pat dry. Still worried? Opt for organic to be certain there's no pesticide residue.



2


Put potatoes into boiling water
It might seem like a time-saver, but adding raw potatoes to boiling water cooks the outside quicker than the inside. For an evenly cooked potato, place in cold water with some salt and use a steady heat to bring up to the boil.



3

Bake potatoes in foil
There’s something wonderfully rustic about campfire-style baked potatoes in foil, but do this in an oven and you can kiss crunchy skin goodbye. Baking in foil should be reserved for when potatoes would otherwise be in direct contact with heat. If you’re using an oven, wash and dry the potatoes, pierce the skins, rub with oil or soft butter and salt, and place on a wire rack over a baking tray to enable the air to circulate – this helps the skin go crisp.

4

Adding oil to pasta water stops it sticking
Pasta doesn’t need a thin layer of oil to prevent it from sticking. Oil stops the sauce from coating the pasta properly and, if overdone, can make the pasta slimy. Instead, use a large pot with plenty of water and only add salt when the water is boiling.

5

Leftovers need to cool down before going in the fridge
The advice that leftovers need to cool down completely before being chilled is outdated, a hangover from when food was stored in iceboxes. Professional bodies now recommend that food is put in the fridge soon after serving and definitely within a couple of hours. This is because when it's left in temperatures of 4°C to 60°C (40°F to 140°F) bacteria can double in number every 30 minutes.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 15, 2021, 12:10 am

Back




Archive

Move

Delete

Spam





16-1
Yahoo
/
A YES IT REALLY HAPPENED



Steven Sheppard <itsallmine68@yahoo.com>
To:
Steven Sheppard

Wed, Feb 10 at 7:20 PM

1

Pizza has a long history. Flatbreads with toppings were consumed by the ancient Egyptians, Romans and Greeks. (The latter ate a version with herbs and oil, similar to today’s focaccia.) But the modern birthplace of pizza is southwestern Italy's Campania region, home to the city of Naples.


Founded around 600 B.C. as a Greek settlement, Naples in the 1700s and early 1800s was a thriving waterfront city. Technically an independent kingdom, it was notorious for its throngs of working poor, or lazzaroni. “The closer you got to the bay, the more dense their population, and much of their living was done outdoors, sometimes in homes that were little more than a room,” says Carol Helstosky, author of Pizza: A Global History and associate professor of history at the University of Denver.
These Neapolitans required inexpensive food that could be consumed quickly. Pizza—flatbreads with various toppings, eaten for any meal and sold by street vendors or informal restaurants—met this need. “Judgmental Italian authors often called their eating habits ‘disgusting,’” Helstosky notes. These early pizzas consumed by Naples’ poor featured the tasty garnishes beloved today, such as tomatoes, cheese, oil, anchovies and garlic.

Italy unified in 1861, and individual Umberto I and Queen Margherita visited Naples in 1889. Legend has it that the traveling pair became bored with their steady diet of French haute cuisine and asked for an assortment of pizzas from the city’s Pizzeria Brandi, the successor to Da Pietro pizzeria, founded in 1760. The variety the queen enjoyed most was called pizza mozzarella, a pie topped with the soft white cheese, red tomatoes and green basil. (Perhaps it was no coincidence that her favorite pie featured the colors of the Italian flag.) From then on, the story goes, that particular topping combination was dubbed pizza Margherita.

Queen Margherita’s blessing could have been the start of an Italy-wide pizza craze. But pizza would remain little known in Italy beyond Naples’ borders until the 1940s.

An ocean away, though, immigrants to the United States from Naples were replicating their trusty, crusty pizzas in New York and other American cities, including Trenton, New Haven, Boston, Chicago and St. Louis. The Neapolitans were coming for factory jobs, as did millions of Europeans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; they weren’t seeking to make a culinary statement. But relatively quickly, the flavors and aromas of pizza began to intrigue non-Neapolitans and non-Italians.

One of the first documented United States pizzerias was G. (for Gennaro) Lombardi’s on Spring Street in Manhattan, licensed to sell pizza in 1905. (Prior to that, the dish was homemade or purveyed by unlicensed vendors.) Lombardi’s, still in operation today though no longer at its 1905 location, “has the same oven as it did originally,” notes food critic John Mariani, author of How Italian Food Conquered the World.

Debates over the finest slice in town can be heated, as any pizza fan knows. But Mariani credited three East Coast pizzerias with continuing to churn out pies in the century-old tradition: Totonno’s (Coney Island, Brooklyn, opened 1924); Mario’s (Arthur Avenue, the Bronx, opened 1919); and Pepe’s (New Haven, opened 1925).
As Italian-Americans, and their food, migrated from city to suburb, east to west, especially after World War II, pizza’s popularity in the United States boomed. No longer seen as an “ethnic” treat, it was increasingly identified as a fast, fun food. Regional, decidedly non-Neapolitan variations emerged, eventually including California-gourmet pizzas topped with anything from barbecued chicken to smoked salmon.


Postwar pizza finally reached Italy and beyond. “Like blue jeans and rock and roll, the rest of the world, including the Italians, picked up on pizza just because it was American,” explains Mariani.
Today international outposts of American chains like Domino’s and Pizza Hut thrive in about 60 different countries. Reflecting local tastes, global pizza toppings can run the gamut from Gouda cheese in Curaçao to hardboiled eggs in Brazil.
2
BJ in MASH 4077

Mike Farrell
M*A*S*H (1975–83) and later roles[edit]
Farrell's big break came in 1975 when Wayne Rogers unexpectedly departed M*A*S*H at the end of the third season. Farrell was quickly recruited for the newly created role of B.J. Hunnicutt, along with co-series lead Harry Morgan, who replaced McLean Stevenson, also at the end of the third season, opposite Alan Alda. Both Morgan and Farrell were big fans of the M*A*S*H series during its early seasons before they both joined the cast, with Morgan having also appeared as "General Bartford Hamilton Steele" in the season-three episode "The General Flipped at Dawn" (for which he won an Emmy Award for Best Guest Role in a Primetime Comedy Series). Farrell stayed with the series for its remaining eight years on the air. During that time, he wrote 5 episodes and directed 4. Since M*A*S*H, Farrell has guest starred in Murder, She Wrote; Justice League; Desperate Housewives; and many others. Farrell voiced Jonathan Kent in Superman: The Animated Series (1996) with wife Shelley Fabares voicing Martha Kent.


Farrell hosted several National Geographic Presents specials and starred in a number of TV movies, including 1983's Memorial Day, which he co-produced.[6] He did two one-man shows: JFK, a One Man Show for PBS and, on stage, a national tour of David W. Rintels' play Clarence Darrow.

In 1985, Farrell partnered with film and television producer Marvin Minoff to create Farrell/Minoff Productions, a production company.[7] Together, Farrell and Minoff produced numerous television movies.[8]

Farrell and Minoff executive produced 2 feature films during their partnership, Dominick and Eugene, a 1988 Orion Pictures film which earned actor Tom Hulce a Golden Globe nomination for best actor.[7] The pair also produced 1998's Patch Adams starring Robin Williams.[8] Farrell and Minoff's professional partnership lasted more than 25 years, until Minoff's death in November 2009

User avatar
Niggly
udonmap.com
Posts: 1491
Joined: December 5, 2018, 5:51 pm
Location: Occasional visitor to The Great Wall of Nong Khai

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » February 15, 2021, 9:14 am

Were you a bit sleepy when making your post Scooby?
Doodoo wrote:
February 15, 2021, 12:10 am
Back




Archive

Move

Delete

Spam





16-1
Yahoo
/
A YES IT REALLY HAPPENED



Steven Sheppard <itsallmine68@yahoo.com>
To:
Steven Sheppard

Wed, Feb 10 at 7:20 PM

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 16, 2021, 5:48 am

1
DANEROUS ANIMALS

Found in sub-Saharan Africa, the Cape Buffalo is also nicknamed ‘Black Death’. It’s a really big beast, weighing up to 900 kg, and their thick horns often measure 100 cm across. The Cape Buffalo isn’t tall and its legs are short, it almost looks harmless but trust us, you don’t want to attack one.
It’s estimated that around 200 people a year are gored, trampled and killed by the beast… Hunters often consider the big bovines to present no great challenge, but it’s a mistake they make at their own peril. The Cape Buffalo is one of the most dangerous animals to hunt, and more big game hunters lives are lost to Cape Buffalo than to lions, tigers and other fearsome predators.

The animal has the reputation to ambush its attackers… circling back on their pursuers and counter attacking. The males will do anything to protect the herd – even chase a lion – and they can get extremely aggressive. If you love hunting you might want to stick with deer.

2

The Siafu ant, also called driver ant, and dorylus is commonly found in Central and East Africa. When food supplies are short, the siafu ant colony is on the move, a real army comprising 20 million individual ants, devouring everything in their path.

Their scissor-like jaws slice through their unfortunate prey, whilst the powerful dissolving acid that oozes from their mouths ensures that meals can be digested quickly, without ever halting the column’s relentless progress. Large numbers of ants can kill small or immobilized animals and eat the flesh. You can easily avoid them as the colony don’t move very fast, but if they decide to pass through your house it could be a highly dangerous zone, and they’ll definitely attack you if you’re not moving.

These ants bite is severely painful, leaving two puncture wounds when removed. Moreover, removal is very difficult, as the jaws are extremely strong and can lift 5000 times the ant’s body weight (BBC). Such is the strength of their jaws that, in East Africa, they are used as natural, emergency sutures by indigenous tribal peoples to stitch the wound by getting the ants to bite on both sides of the gash, then breaking off the body.

3

Toxic, aggressive and able to move at lightning speeds, the Black Mamba has a fearsome reputation in sub-Saharan Africa. This is a region where around 1.5 million people suffer a snake bite of one kind or another every year. Been attacked? You’d better hope it was a different species. Most people who encounter a Black Mamba end up six feet under.

You could run, but the Black Mamba is the fastest land snake on the planet, able to travel at speeds up to 12 miles per hour, making escape on foot unlikely. Been cornered? The end is near, this amongst the most venomous predators around, with death sometimes following a fatal bite in as little as 20 minutes.

Some 20,000 people die from snake bites in sub-Saharan Africa each year and the Black Mamba is responsible for more than its fair share. Steer clear at all costs or the chances are you’ll pay the ultimate price.

4

Swimming just beneath the surface, the Indonesian needlefish isn’t known as an aggressive creature. Yet this is a dangerous species that can and does kill. Inflicting injuries – fatal or otherwise – is, in most cases, accidental. Yet this makes the needlefish no less dangerous.
Measuring up to three feet, this dagger-shaped ocean dweller has a long beak that is packed with razor-sharp teeth. From time to time, needlefish launch themselves out of the water at speeds of almost 40 miles per hour. Those in their path can be stabbed by these fast-flying spears. The injuries inflicted can be severe, the wounds deep, and the consequences sometimes grave.

Needlefish are often drawn to artificial light – putting those who engage in night fishing at the greatest risk of all. They’ve been known to leap into boats – impaling unfortunate anglers and ensuring that their reputation for danger remains intact. For many traditional Pacific Islander communities, who commonly fish on reefs from low boats, the species represent an greater risk of injury than sharks.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 17, 2021, 5:54 am

Sound of Music
1

Plummer's singing voice was dubbed
Singer Bill Lee provided the singing voice for Captain von Trapp. Also dubbed in the movie is the singing voice of Mother Abbess, played by Peggy Woods.
2
20th Century-Fox almost didn’t make 'The Sound of Music'
When the Broadway show opened in 1959 and proved to be such a smash hit, the studio, which had already produced four R&H adaptations, bought film rights for $1.25 million. Then came Cleopatra,


the $40 million drain on studio resources that temporarily shut Fox down and made any new expensive undertaking an iffy proposition. It was only when Richard Zanuck took over Fox production reins that the property was revived.

3

Other actors were considered for the roles of Maria and Captain von Trapp
Doris Day was seriously considered for the role of Maria, along with Leslie Caron, Anne Bancroft and even Grace Kelly. Walter Matthau was actually tested for the role of Captain von Trapp, with other names like Yul Brynner and Bing Crosby also floated for the part. Luckily, footage of Andrews in Mary Poppins was available to the filmmakers and she became the top choice. And Christopher Plummer was selected for the dash of danger he could bring to the Captain.

3

The actress who played Liesl was a bit older than '16 going on 17'
Charmian Carr was 21 going on 22 when she portrayed the eldest von Trapp sibling. Nonetheless, she beat out competitors like Lesley Ann Warren, Teri Garr, Sharon Tate and Mia Farrow for the role.

4
Shooting “Do-Re-Mi” was not exactly as easy as ABC
The Salzburg, Austria location filming that served The Sound of Music so well was a nearly constant battle against the elements since it was a very wet and chilly spring in the von Trapps’ hometown. Waiting for the sun extended location shooting from eight to 11 weeks, and the “Do-Re-Mi” number, which occupies about nine minutes of screen time, took almost two months to complete.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 18, 2021, 5:49 am

1
Fender Guitars

Produce 90,000 strings per day for their guitars. That is about 20,000 miles per year

2

The Wipers Times was a trench magazine that was published by British soldiers fighting in the Ypres Salient during the First World War.

In early 1916, the 12th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters stationed in the front line at Ypres, Belgium, came across an abandoned printing press. A sergeant who had been a printer in peacetime salvaged it and printed a sample page. The paper itself was named after Tommy slang pronunciation of Ypres

Under its initial title The Wipers Times and Salient News, the first issue was published on 6 February 1916, with a circulation of one hundred copies. It was followed by another 22 issues, mostly consisting of 12 pages each.[1]

While the size and the layout of the magazine remained consistent, its main title changed many times. Previous titles remained listed in the subtitle in chronological order, for instance: The B.E.F. Times: with which are incorporated The Wipers Times, The "New Church" Times, The Kemmel Times & The Somme-Times.[2] Every main title change initiates a new volume and issue sequence and as result, there are several instances of 'volume 1, number 1'.

Publication was held up after February 1918 by the German offensive on the western front in that year, but at the end of the War, two issues were published as The Better Times. The second of these was billed as the Xmas, Peace and Final Number.


3

Samuel Holloway Bowers (August 25, 1924 – November 5, 2006) was a convicted murderer and leading white supremacist in Mississippi during the Civil Rights Movement. In response to this movement and perceived threats to national security from Judaism and Communism, he co-founded the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and became its Imperial Wizard. Bowers was best known for committing two murders of civil rights activists in southern Mississippi. He was responsible for the 1964 murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner near Philadelphia, for which he served six years in federal prison; and the 1966 murder of Vernon Dahmer in Hattiesburg, for which he was sentenced to life in prison, 32 years after the crime. He also was accused of bombings of Jewish targets in the cities of Jackson and Meridian in 1967 and 1968 (according to the man who was convicted of some of the bombings, Thomas A. Tarrants III). He died in prison at the age of 82.

In 1964, community activists from Congress of Racial Equality and Students for a Democratic Society launched Freedom Summer. Later that year, three of these activists - James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman - were murdered. Sam Bowers was convicted in 1967 for his role in the Chaney-Schwerner-Goodman killings and served his sentence at McNeil Island Federal Prison in Washington. He was released in 1976 and then worked as a Sunday School teacher.

Two other men, Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee, were murdered at that time because they were suspected of being civil rights activists also. However, it was later determined that Bowers was not involved with their deaths. Klansman and former police officer James Ford Seale was arrested for this crime in 2007. Charles Marcus Edwards also participated in the abduction and beating and testified that he was the one who had identified Dee as a target because "he fit the profile of a Black Panther..." Seale and Edwards were convicted because journalists, particularly Canadian filmmaker David Ridgen in his award-winning CBC documentary Mississippi Cold Case, investigated the case and discovered incriminating evidence.[8]

In January 1966, Bowers, along with a number of other members of the White Knights of the KKK, was subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee to testify about Klan activities. Although Byron De La Beckwith gave his name when asked by the committee (but would answer no other substantive questions), other witnesses, such as Bowers, invoked the Fifth Amendment even in response to that question.[9]

In 1966 alleged members of the White Knights firebombed the house of Vernon Dahmer, a civil rights activist who was working to register African Americans for the vote. Dahmer died of burn injuries which covered 40% of his body and damage to his lungs, which were seared while rescuing his family from the fire.[10]

According to later testimony by ex-White Knights member T. Webber Rogers, Bowers gave the direct order to have Dahmer killed, "in any way possible." After four previous trials ended in deadlock (a 1968 jury split 11 to 1 in favor of guilty, and in 1969 a jury split 10-2 in favor of conviction),[11] Bowers was convicted of the murder in August 1998 and sentenced to life in prison.

In 1967, White Knights are alleged to have begun a campaign against Jewish targets in Mississippi. Beth Israel Congregation in Jackson and Congregation Beth Israel in Meridian were bombed. Also, the home of Jackson's Rabbi Perry Nussbaum was attacked. The actual perpetrators of these crimes were suspects Thomas A. Tarrants III and Kathy Ainsworth.

The FBI became involved in the case and, with threatening accusations against local law enforcement, it began to track down potential bombers.

A breakthrough in the case came when two Klan brothers, Alton Wayne Roberts and Raymond Roberts, met with the FBI and the police in exchange for reward money and immunity. Alton Wayne Roberts had previously been sentenced to 10 years in prison for violating the civil rights of Chaney, Schwerner and Goodman. He agreed to cooperate in order to receive a reduced sentence.

A joint FBI and local police operation ambushed Tarrants and Ainsworth. Ainsworth was killed and Tarrants was severely wounded.[12]

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 19, 2021, 5:54 am

1

Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG was formed in 1916. This company was renamed to Bayerische Motoren Werke (BMW) in 1922. However the name BMW dates back to 1913, when the original company to use the name was founded by Karl Rapp (initially as Rapp Motorenwerke GmbH). BMW's first product was a straight-six aircraft engine called the BMW IIIa. Following the end of World War I, BMW remained in business by producing motorcycle engines, farm equipment, household items and railway brakes. The company produced its first motorcycle, the BMW R 32 in 1923.

BMW became an automobile manufacturer in 1928 when it purchased Fahrzeugfabrik Eisenach, which, at the time, built Austin Sevens under licence under the Dixi marque.[3] The first car sold as a BMW was a rebadged Dixi called the BMW 3/15, following BMW's acquisition of the car manufacturer Automobilwerk Eisenach. Throughout the 1930s, BMW expanded its range into sports cars and larger luxury cars.

Aircraft engines, motorcycles, and automobiles would be BMW's main products until World War II. During the war, against the wishes of its director Franz Josef Popp[citation needed], BMW concentrated on aircraft engine production using forced labor consisting primarily of prisoners from concentration camps, with motorcycles as a side line and automobile manufacture ceased altogether. BMW's factories were heavily bombed during the war and its remaining West German facilities were banned from producing motor vehicles or aircraft after the war. Again, the company survived by making pots, pans, and bicycles. In 1948, BMW restarted motorcycle production. BMW resumed car production in Bavaria in 1952 with the BMW 501 luxury saloon. The range of cars was expanded in 1955, through the production of the cheaper Isetta microcar under licence. Slow sales of luxury cars and small profit margins from microcars meant BMW was in serious financial trouble and in 1959 the company was nearly taken over by rival Daimler-Benz. A large investment in BMW by Herbert Quandt and Harald Quandt resulted in the company surviving as a separate entity. The BMW 700 was successful and assisted in the company's recovery.


The 1962 introduction of the BMW New Class compact sedans was the beginning of BMW's reputation as a leading manufacturer of sport-oriented cars. Throughout the 1960s, BMW expanded its range by adding coupe and luxury sedan models. The BMW 5 Series mid-size sedan range was introduced in 1972, followed by the BMW 3 Series compact sedans in 1975, the BMW 6 Series luxury coupes in 1976 and the BMW 7 Series large luxury sedans in 1978.

The BMW M division released its first road car, a mid-engine supercar, in 1978. This was followed by the BMW M5 in 1984 and the BMW M3 in 1986. Also in 1986, BMW introduced its first V12 engine in the 750i luxury sedan.

The company purchased the Rover Group in 1994, however the takeover was not successful and was causing BMW large financial losses. In 2000, BMW sold off most of the Rover brands, retaining only the Mini brand.

In 1998, BMW also acquired the rights to the Rolls Royce brand from Vickers Plc.

The 1995 BMW Z3 expanded the line-up to include a mass-production two-seat roadster and the 1999 BMW X5 was the company's entry into the SUV market.

The first modern mass-produced turbocharged petrol engine was introduced in 2006, (from 1973 to 1975, BMW built 1672 units of a turbocharged M10 engine for the BMW 2002 turbo),[4] with most engines switching over to turbocharging over the 2010s. The first hybrid BMW was the 2010 BMW ActiveHybrid 7, and BMW's first mass-production electric car was the BMW i3 city car, which was released in 2013, (from 1968 to 1972, BMW built two battery-electric BMW 1602 Elektro saloons for the 1972 Olympic Games).[5] After many years of establishing a reputation for sporting rear-wheel drive cars, BMW's first front-wheel drive car was the 2014 BMW 2 Series Active Tourer multi-purpose vehicle (MPV).


In January 2021, BMW announced that its sales in 2020 fell by 8.4% due to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions. However, in the fourth quarter of 2020, BMW witnessed a rise of 3.2% of its customers' demands.

2

Hippos are huge. They’re also aggressive. Responsible for around 500 human deaths in Africa each year, Hippopotamus rank amongst the most dangerous large land mammals on the planet. Take our advice and steer well clear. Go head to head with a Hippo and the chances are you’ll pay the ultimate price.

Measuring up to 16 feet long, five feet tall and weighing as much as 4,500 kg, this is an immense beast. With large teeth and tusks — and able to move at significant speeds — Hippopotamus take no prisoners. In their path? You’re in big trouble.

Unpredictable and always up for a fight, this is a territorial monster that can attack on land or in the water. Whether charging across the plains or capsizing boats with its giant head, the Hippo is a no-nonsense killing machine. Not understanding their nature, some people underestimate Hippopotamus which can prove to be a costly mistake.

3

It measures one inch and weighs one ounce, but don’t be fooled by the diminutive Golden Poison Dart Frog. This ranks amongst the most toxic creatures on the planet. It might only be as big as a paperclip, but it packs quite a punch.

Native to the rainforests of Colombia’s Pacific Coast, the Golden Poison Dart Frog varies in colour — it can be yellow, orange or green — but no matter its attractive appearance, this is an amphibian to avoid.

The deadly frog’s skin is coated with a toxin that is extraordinarily potent. Each creature can boast sufficient poison to kill up to 20 men — or two African bull elephants. Muscular paralysis and heart failure ensure that those unfortunate enough to come into close contract experience a grim end. Small it might be, but the Golden Poison Dart Frog poses a danger that couldn’t be greater. Size isn’t everything.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 20, 2021, 7:23 am

Lawrence of Arabia Facts
1

This movie was banned in many Arab countries as they felt Arab historical figures and the Arab peoples were misrepresented. Omar Sharif arranged a viewing with President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt to show him that there was nothing wrong with the way they were portrayed. Nasser loved the movie and allowed it to be released in Egypt, where it went on to become a monster hit.

2
individual Hussein of Jordan lent an entire brigade of his Arab Legion as extras for the movie, so most of the film's "soldiers" are played by real soldiers. Hussein frequently visited the sets and became enamored of a young British secretary, Antoinette Gardiner, who became his second wife in 1962. Their eldest son, Abdullah II individual Of Jordan, ascended to the throne in 1999.

3
The first time Peter O'Toole tried riding a camel, blood oozed from his jeans. "This is a very delicate Irish arse", he warned his instructor. He finally mastered his camel-riding technique by adding a layer of sponge rubber under the saddle to ease his bruised backside--a practical innovation quickly adopted by the actual Bedouin tribesmen acting as extras during the desert location filming. O'Toole was nicknamed "ab al-'Isfanjah" ("father of the sponge") by the Bedouin.

4
In the actual Battle of Aqaba, T.E. Lawrence was nearly killed when his camel threw him after he accidentally shot it in the head. In a notable coincidence, during filming Peter O'Toole was nearly killed: a gun or rocket used to signal "action" in the first Aqaba take fired prematurely and O'Toole was thrown by his panicked camel in front of the charging horses. (Other accounts hold that O'Toole was temporarily blinded by pellets from an effects gun and lost control of his animal or that he was too inebriated to hold on.) Fortunately for O'Toole, the camel--trained for such mishaps--stood over him and prevented his being trampled.

5
Peter O'Toole won his career-making (and legendary) part as T.E. Lawrence after it was turned down by superstar Marlon Brando and a then-unknown Albert Finney. Director Sir David Lean and producer Sam Spiegel wanted Brando. Spiegel had produced On the Waterfront (1954), the movie for which Brando and Spiegel had won their first Oscars. But Brando turned the role down, allegedly saying he didn't want to spend two years of his life riding on a camel. Their second choice Finney was put through extensive screen tests costing 100-thousand pounds sterling, but he refused to sign a 7-year contract demanded by Spiegel. O'Toole signed the 7-year contract and got the part.

6
Peter O'Toole was often injured during filming. He received third-degree burns, sprained both ankles, tore ligaments in both his hip and thigh, broke his thumb, dislocated his spine, fractured his skull, was bitten by a camel, sprained his neck, tore a groin muscle, and was concussed twice. He also seriously injured his hand during filming by punching through the window of a caravan while drunk. A brace or bandage can be seen on his left thumb during the first train attack scene, presumably due to this incident.

7
José Ferrer was initially very unsatisfied about the small part he was offered. He only accepted on condition that he be paid $25,000, more than Peter O'Toole and Omar Sharif combined, plus a factory-made Porsche. Ironically, Ferrer once said about his tiny role that he considered it to be the finest acting of his career.

8
While shooting Peter O'Toole and I.S. Johar riding together on a single camel, Sir David Lean saw that they had trouble staying on the animal. On closer inspection, a large block of hashish was discovered. Both actors were completely stoned. Shooting was abandoned for the day.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 21, 2021, 7:25 am

1

It’s no great surprise to find Lions on a list like this. Ranking amongst the planet’s foremost predators, this is a beast built for hunting. The African Lion prefers other animals to people. But that doesn’t mean that the threat should be taken lightly.
Far from it, in fact. Fierce and fast, Lions kill around 250 people a year in Africa. This is a powerful animal indeed — making it ironic that the greatest danger to human life is thought to come from the sick and the elderly.

Lions that are older and/or infirm are unable to hunt their natural prey as effectively, making people — a relatively easy kill — an attractive alternative. For those unfortunate enough to cross paths, running is not an option, the Lion fast on its feet and prone to pounce the minute your back is turned. Cornered? Stand your ground, show no fear — and keep your fingers crossed.

2
Mosquitos are tiny. Yet the dangers these miniscule blood suckers pose could not be bigger. The most dangerous creature on the planet? Few present greater risks to human health.

In itself, the Mosquito’s bite is little more than an annoyance, causing swelling, irritation and mild symptoms that pose few real problems. But this is an insect that can and does transmit fatal diseases. Health experts estimate that, each year, millions of people worldwide die as a result of Mosquito-borne maladies.

Those diseases? Most people know about Malaria, which is believed to be responsible for more than 400,000 global deaths on an annual basis. Factor in Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever and the Zika and West Nile Viruses and it’s clear that the Mosquito’s devastating impact on human health is, in the main, grossly underestimated. Repellents and nets are available, yet this annoying insect sometimes inexplicably manages to defeat the protection.

3

The name says it all. Russia’s Valley of Death is a destination to avoid at all costs. Those who do get too close risk never returning. The bodies that litter the landscape underline the dangers that await. Thinking about paying a visit? Trust us on this one and think again.

Lying beneath Kikhpinych, a stratovolcano on the remote Kamchatka Peninsula, the Valley of Death traps the poisonous gases that emerge from countless cracks in the Earth’s surface. Hydrogen Sulfide, Carbon Dioxide, Sulphur Dioxide and other dangerous elements make for a toxic brew. With no wind to disperse the deadly gases, just breathing the air here can be fatal.

Innumerable bird and mammal carcases lie all around in what has become an eerie animal graveyard. Those heading here risk suffering a similar fate, and visitors are not encouraged. Since the Valley of Death was first discovered in the 1930s, many adventurers have found the lure too hard to resist. Not all have returned.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 22, 2021, 12:09 am

1

Mao Zedong was a Chinese revolutionary, political theorist, and communist leader who led the People’s Republic of China. Mao, while controversial, is still widely considered a savior of the nation. I did a semester abroad in China in 2001 after falling in love with its history, and was surprised in my conversations that many people thought Mao had done 70% – 80% good things. During his first five years from 1949 – 53 he is said to have systematically killed between 4 to 6 million people by sentencing them to die or by sending them to “reform through labor” camps. He organized mass repressions, established execution quotas, and defended his actions in these early years as necessary for securing power for “The People’s Republic of China”.

His social programs the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution are two of the most ill-fated, poorly named, initiatives ever. The first was an effort to rapidly industrialize China. His focus was on making China a premier exporter of steel, and to this end he asked everybody to make it. The problem was it got many citizens to make smelting shops in their backyards. Not only was the steel of little value, but it was made from everything lying around the house including their own cooking supplies! Without the tools to make food, no money coming in from the steel, and no money to survive ~ a lot of people starved to death. The estimates on this program alone are 20 million deaths! Think about that number. Really think about it. Then ask yourself… why would you EVER let someone back into power after such an insanely bad decision.Well, they took the reigns away from him for a short time.
In the interim Mao started the socialist education movement. He aimed the concept at young ones who would eventually wrest the power away from the older guard. By 1964 this movement was renamed the “four cleanups movement” whose goal was cleansing politics, economics, ideas, and organization of “reactionaries”. This led to the formation of the “Red Guards” who were organized to punish intellectuals and take out Mao’s political adversaries. The Cultural Revolution was now underway, and its overriding mission was to abolish: Old Customs, Old Culture, Old Habits, and Old Ideas. Something Mao fervently believed in was that destruction and chaos could bring re-birth. So he told his followers to destroy buildings, sacred objects, talk back to ones elders, punish them, turn them in, and kill those who did not agree. By 1968 things were starting to look pretty good for Mao all over again, and so he put into place the decade long “Down to the Countryside Movement” which forced young intellectuals to move out to the country to become farmers. Sadly, the people he pushed out there were the same Red Guards who had helped him get power. Estimates of the death toll are between 40,000 – 7 million depending on who you ask.
Finally, there is the 100 flowers movement which just needs an abbreviated mention here. Mao asked people to come forth and tell him how he should govern China. Intellectuals and liberals bit at the chance to tell him what they really thought, and were encouraged by the Communist party to do so. Then in a sudden change of heart, or an incredibly crafty mission to out his haters, the government persecuted 500,000 of them who were considered to be “dangerous thinkers”.

Mao is essentially like that girlfriend/boyfriend who keeps on taking a ---- on you, but is so damn charming you hardly notice. His policies and political purges from 1949 to 1976 caused the deaths of 49 to 78 million people.


2

Xenia (Greek: ξενία) is the ancient Greek sacred rule of hospitality (corresponding to the Latin concept of hospitium), the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home or associates of the host. The rituals of hospitality created and expressed a reciprocal relationship between guest and host expressed in both material benefits (e.g. gifts, protection, shelter) as well as non-material ones (e.g. favors, certain normative rights). The term is often translated 'guest-friendship' (or 'ritualized friendship'), because the rituals of hospitality created and expressed a reciprocal relationship between guest and host. The word is derived from xenos 'guest-friend'.

The Greek god Zeus is sometimes called Zeus Xenios in his role as a protector of xenia. He thus embodied the religious obligation to be hospitable to travelers. Theoxeny or theoxenia is a theme in Greek mythology in which human beings demonstrate their virtue or piety by extending hospitality to a humble stranger (xenos), who turns out to be a disguised deity (theos) with the capacity to bestow rewards. These stories caution mortals that any guest should be treated as if potentially a disguised divinity and help establish the idea of xenia as a fundamental Greek custom.[1][2] The term theoxenia also covered entertaining among the gods themselves, a popular subject in classical art, which was revived at the Renaissance in works depicting a Feast of the Gods.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 23, 2021, 5:50 am

1

Feeling brave? You’ll need great courage to travel down the ever-dangerous Death Road. Known also as Yungas Road, this ranks amongst the deadliest routes on Earth. Yet still tourists are drawn to Bolivia to experience the death-defying drive from the capital, La Paz.

Death Road’s nickname could not be more appropriate. Between 200 and 300 people are said to die here on an annual basis. Take a look at the road conditions and it isn’t difficult to understand why.

Death Road was built by Paraguayan prisoners in the 1930s and, although some improvements have been made in subsequent years, it remains hazardous in the extreme. Cut into the striking cliffside, the road is steep and narrow, with countless twists and turns that pose great dangers to those courageous enough to come here. Planning to tackle Death Road? Don’t get too close to the edge. The abyss awaits so be sure to take your time.

2

More People Have Been Killed by Molasses Than by Coyotes
The Great Molasses Flood, also known as the Boston Molasses Disaster or the Great Boston Molasses Flood,[1][2] occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. A large storage tank filled with 2.3 million US gal (8,700 m3)[3] weighing approximately 13,000 short tons (12,000 t) of molasses burst, and the resultant wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150.[4] The event entered local folklore and residents claimed for decades afterwards that the area still smelled of molasses on hot summer days.

3

Nintendo Was Founded in 1889 as a Trading Card Company
Nintendo Co., Ltd. is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics and video game company headquartered in Kyoto. The company was founded in 1889 as Nintendo Karuta[c] by craftsman Fusajiro Yamauchi and originally produced handmade hanafuda playing cards. After venturing into various lines of business during the 1960s and acquiring a legal status as a public company under the current company name, Nintendo distributed its first video game console, the Color TV-Game, in 1977. It gained international recognition with the release of the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1985.

Since then, Nintendo has produced some of the most successful consoles in the video game industry, such as the Game Boy, the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, the Nintendo DS, the Wii, and the Nintendo Switch. It released numerous influential franchises, including Mario, Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda, Pokémon, Kirby, Metroid, Fire Emblem, Animal Crossing, Splatoon, Star Fox, and Super Smash Bros.

Nintendo has multiple subsidiaries in Japan and abroad, in addition to business partners such as The Pokémon Company and HAL Laboratory. Both the company and its staff have received numerous awards for their achievements, including Emmy Awards for Technology & Engineering, Game Developers Choice Awards and British Academy Games Awards among others. Nintendo is one of the wealthiest and most valuable companies in the Japanese market.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 3198
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » February 24, 2021, 1:35 am

1

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II[N 1] is a tandem two-seat, twin-engine, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor and fighter-bomber originally developed for the United States Navy by McDonnell Aircraft.[2] It first entered service in 1961 with the Navy.[3] Proving highly adaptable, it was also adopted by the United States Marine Corps and the United States Air Force, and by the mid-1960s had become a major part of their air arms.


The Phantom is a large fighter with a top speed of over Mach 2.2. It can carry more than 18,000 pounds (8,400 kg) of weapons on nine external hardpoints, including air-to-air missiles, air-to-ground missiles, and various bombs. The F-4, like other interceptors of its time, was initially designed without an internal cannon. Later models incorporated an M61 Vulcan rotary cannon. Beginning in 1959, it set 15 world records for in-flight performance,[5] including an absolute speed record and an absolute altitude record.[6]

The F-4 was used extensively during the Vietnam War. It served as the principal air superiority fighter for the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps and became important in the ground-attack and aerial reconnaissance roles late in the war. During the Vietnam War, one U.S. Air Force pilot, two weapon systems officers (WSOs),[7] one U.S. Navy pilot and one radar intercept officer (RIO) became aces by achieving five aerial kills against enemy fighter aircraft.[8] The F-4 continued to form a major part of U.S. military air power throughout the 1970s and 1980s, being gradually replaced by more modern aircraft such as the F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon in the U.S. Air Force, the F-14 Tomcat in the U.S. Navy, and the F/A-18 Hornet in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.

The F-4 Phantom II remained in use by the U.S. in the reconnaissance and Wild Weasel (Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses) roles in the 1991 Gulf War, finally leaving service in 1996.[9][10] It was also the only aircraft used by both U.S. flight demonstration teams: the United States Air Force Thunderbirds (F-4E) and the United States Navy Blue Angels (F-4J).[4][11][12] The F-4 was also operated by the armed forces of 11 other nations. Israeli Phantoms saw extensive combat in several Arab–Israeli conflicts, while Iran used its large fleet of Phantoms, acquired before the fall of the Shah, in the Iran–Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built, making it the most produced American supersonic military aircraft.[4][13] As of 2020, 62 years after its first flight, the F-4 remains in service with Iran, Japan, South Korea, Greece, and Turkey. The aircraft has most recently been in service against the Islamic State group in the Middle East.

2
Death Statistics In Vending Machines
According to research, there were some 37 deaths attributed to vending machines between the years of 1978 and 1995. In order to crunch the figures some more, that was about 2.18 deaths annually, in the US. In essence, that means that 1 in every 112 million people in the US are likely to die from an accident resulting from a vending machine. That makes the vending machine about twice as deadly as a shark attack.
3
More Photos Were Taken in the Last 2 Minutes than in the Entire 19th Century
How Many Photos in 2020?
To begin answering these questions, we got in touch with our friends at Keypoint Intelligence. They’re interested in photos as well, and they had some fascinating data for us. Turns out, humanity will take 1,436,300,000,000 photos in 2020… that’s over 1.4 trillion. At first glance, that seems like a staggering number. And in some ways it is.

4

A 2007 virus wiped out 20% of blue agave plants in Mexico. Then farmers began burning their agave fields to replace it with corn, which is much cheaper and easier to grow. As a result, prices exploded by 500% and supplies crashed. Independent farmers are picking up the slack, but it takes over a decade for a blue agave plant to bloom, so tequila is going to be rarer and more expensive for a while.

Post Reply

Return to “Open Forum”