Yes it really happened

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jackspratt
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » March 29, 2021, 11:54 am

Doodoo wrote:
March 29, 2021, 12:11 am

Cracked Phone Screen? WD-40 Can Fix It!
It might be hard to believe that WD-40 can take care of so many problems. But it can, making it a truly miraculous product. Here’s another example of a common problem that WD-40 can help with: cracked phone screens.
It won’t completely “cure” the crack or scratches but can improve the screen’s appearance. Just spray it on and wipe it off with a dry, clean cloth. It will at least buy you some time until you’re able to purchase a new phone.
Even Dr google can't provide evidence of this - so I reckon No It Can't!



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » March 29, 2021, 1:55 pm


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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » March 29, 2021, 3:13 pm

Fix a cracked phone screen - even your link doesn't claim it can.
Can you fix a cracked phone screen with wd40?

Here's another example of a common problem that WD-40 can help with: cracked phone screens. It won't completely “cure” the crack or scratches but can improve the screen's appearance. Just spray it on and wipe it off with a dry, clean cloth. It will at least buy you some time until you're able to purchase a new phone.
Improving the screen's appearance - which any screen cleaning fluid can do - is hardly "fixing" it.

No, it really can't.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » March 30, 2021, 7:54 am

Jobs that are , well, Gone

1

Milkman
Every morning in the 1950s, like clockwork, the milkman would deliver bottles and jugs filled to the brim with milk. If you were lucky, sometimes he would even deliver other kitchen essentials like eggs and butter. With the rise of home refrigeration the milk stayed, but the profession expired. Maybe if they delivered cookies too, milkmen would've had a better chance?

2


Gandy Dancer
A Gandy Dancer actually has nothing to do with movin' your hips. The title is slang for a railroad worker who maintained the tracks years before the work was done by machines.

3

Chimney Sweep
This job has been around for hundreds of years, peaking during the Industrial Revolution and then falling into a steep decline after the adoption of electric and gas alternatives. Fun fact: Door-to-door chimney sweeps were called knellers.


4

Billy Boy
Pinky's up! In the'50s and'60s, Billy boys were young apprentices in training that would make tea for the other men at work. Seems strikingly similar to an intern grabbing a load of Starbucks, right? Some things never change.

5

Typist
Typists are still in-demand today, just without the typewriter. In the 1940s, typists were popular positions within the publishing, administrative and clerical industries. The role today has simply been upgraded with computers.

I can remember walking into the Pool in the 70's

6

Icemen
In the early 1800s, ice cutting was the common task of hand-sawing individual ice blocks from lakes and rivers to help store cold food throughout the winter. Then refrigerators were invented and the heavy-lifting job chilled out.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Niggly » March 30, 2021, 9:27 am

Jobs that are, well NOT Gone

Milkman
Returned to base just last week after delivering to The Boy on their route. They also deliver juices, meats, ready meals, pies & sweet treats (including cookies).
Happy to help

Image


Mind you, anyone quoting a website that says rubbing toothpaste on a smartphone screen will remove scratches can't be expected to get facts right can they
Home Cable TV’s new Archive Officer

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » March 31, 2021, 1:34 am

1

This band formed in Boston in 1970 and went on to produce many hit albums throughout the decade including, "Toys in the Attic" (1975) and "Draw the Line" (1977). Can you identify them?

2

Formed in Los Angeles in 1971, this band's discography includes albums such as "Desperado" (1973) and "Hotel California" (1976). Do you know them?

3
NASCAR on CBS
- Total length: 40 years
- Network: CBS
- First broadcast: Feb. 12, 1960
- Final broadcast: July 15, 2000


4

MASH

THE INFAMOUS SHOWER SCENE NEEDED A FEW DISTRACTIONS.
For the scene in which the officers ambush “Hot Lips” (played by Sally Kellerman) so they can see her naked in the shower, Altman had to deploy a few distractions. Kellerman had never appeared nude onscreen before, and in early takes of the scene she was dropping to the ground before the point of the moment was even made clear. So Altman had to think of distractions to get her to pause before falling to the ground.

“When I looked up, there was Gary Burghoff stark naked standing in front of me,” Kellerman said. “The next take, [Altman] had Tamara Horrocks, she was the more amply endowed nurse, without her shirt on … So I attribute my Academy Award nomination to the people who made my mouth hang open when I hit the deck.”















ANSWERS

1
Aerosmith
Believe it or not, this band hailing from Boston is one of the best-selling rock bands of all time. With over 70 million albums sold, each band member has hit millionaire status many times over, with a net worth of over $100 million… each! They were also the first band to appear on "The Simpsons."


2

Eagles
This band holds the record for the top-selling album of the 20th century: “Their Greatest Hits (1971-1975).” In true 70s fashion, the name for the band came to them while they were high on peyote deep in the Mojave Desert. And even though they’re well past retirement age, they’re still going strong to this day!

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 1, 2021, 6:37 am

1

Hobart's Funnies is the nickname given to a number of specialist armoured fighting vehicles derived from tanks operated during the Second World War by units of the 79th Armoured Division of the British Army or by specialists from the Royal Engineers.[1]

They were designed in light of problems that more standard tanks experienced during the amphibious Dieppe Raid, so that the new models would be able to overcome the problems of the planned Invasion of Normandy. These tanks played a major part on the Commonwealth beaches during the landings. They were forerunners of the modern combat engineering vehicle and took their nickname from the 79th Division's commander, Major General Percy Hobart.

The vehicles converted were chiefly Churchill tanks, and American-supplied M4 Sherman tanks.



2

Frances "Poppy" Northcutt, graduated from University of Texas at Austin with a degree in mathematics and started as a contractor for TRW Systems (now a part of Northrup Grumman) working for NASA in 1965 as a human “computress.” “What a weird title this is,” she recalled thinking then, in an interview with TIME magazine in 2019 “Not only do they think I’m a computer, but they think I’m a gendered computer.” She was promoted a year later to a Return-to-Earth Specialist, calculating mission trajectories. Making her the first women in a technical position at Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.
Poppy was the only woman working in NASA's Mission Control during the Apollo 8 mission. (Her work involved Trans-Earth Injection.) One thing she knew from a young age was that she did not want to be in a stereotypical female role, like a nurse, teacher, or secretary. She went into a mathematics field because it was male-dominated. For her, that signaled better pay and more opportunities.
She went on to be involved with Apollo 10, 11, 12, and 13—where Northcutt's team troubleshot the Apollo 13 oxygen tank explosion emergency. After continued work on advanced mission problems, she held a position in the Houston mayoral office as a women’s advocate. Following that, her career focus shifted to the law, where she worked as an engineer while obtaining her law degree.
Serving as the first prosecutor in the domestic violence unit of the district attorney’s office in her county and moving into private practice, she had a career focused on women’s rights. She was an advocate for the Texas Equal Rights Amendment, passed in 1972.
How did her work in space missions help her law career? According to an interview with Space.com, she was accustomed to"evaluating the reasonableness of technical evidence." A continuing advocate, she describes herself on social media as: “One time rocket scientist, sometime lawyer, full time feminist.”

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 3, 2021, 7:23 am

1

On April 1, 1700, English pranksters begin popularizing the annual tradition of April Fools’ Day by playing practical jokes on each other.
Although the day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery.
Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes.
These pranks included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as poisson d’avril (April fish), said to symbolize a young, “easily hooked” fish and a gullible person.
April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.

2

Peanuts
One of the most common allergies is to peanuts. The most severe response is anaphylaxis, which can lead to severe constriction of the airways, shock, and even loss of consciousness. It is dangerous enough to cause death if left untreated, so know your allergies before stepping anywhere near these babies or their addictive friend, peanut butter.


3

Potatoes
Potatoes have both poisonous stems and leaves, but even so, potato poisoning is rare. Most potato-related deaths come from eating green potatoes, or drinking potato leaf tea.

4

Almonds
This seed (no, it isn't actually a nut) may pack in many health benefits — but they are also potentially full of poison. Bitter almonds, while in their raw form, are full of cynaide. They need to go through a specialized heat treatment (more than just your DIY oven roasting) in order to remove the toxins.

5

Honey
Pyrrolizidine alkaloids, poisonous toxins, are found in this sweet and sticky treat. If honey isn't pasteurized properly, eating it can lead to headaches, dizziness, weakness and vomiting — eating too much of it can be fatal.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 4, 2021, 1:55 am

1

Jeannette Rankin, first woman elected to U.S. Congress, assumes office
Born on a ranch near Missoula, Montana Territory, in 1880, Rankin was a social worker in the states of Montana and Washington before joining the women’s suffrage movement in 1910. Working with various suffrage groups, she campaigned for the women’s vote on a national level and in 1914 was instrumental in the passage of suffrage legislation in Montana. Two years later, she successfully ran for Congress in Montana on a progressive Republican platform calling for total women’s suffrage, legislation protecting children, and U.S. neutrality in the European war. Following her election as a representative, Rankin’s entrance into Congress was delayed for a month as congressmen discussed whether a woman should be admitted into the House of Representatives.
Finally, on April 2, 1917, she was introduced in Congress as its first female member. The same day, President Woodrow Wilson addressed a joint session of Congress and urged a declaration of war against Germany. On April 4, the Senate voted for war by a wide majority, and on April 6 the vote went to the House. Citing public opinion in Montana and her own pacifist beliefs, Jeannette Rankin was one of only 50 representatives who voted against the American declaration of war. For the remainder of her first term in Congress, she sponsored legislation to aid women and children, and advocated the passage of a federal suffrage amendment.
In 1918, Rankin unsuccessfully ran for a Senate seat, and in 1919 she left Congress to become an important figure in a number of suffrage and pacifist organizations. In 1940, with the U.S. entrance into another world war imminent, she was again elected as a pacifist representative from Montana and, after assuming office, argued vehemently against President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s war preparations. On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and the next day, at Roosevelt’s urging, Congress passed a formal declaration of war against Japan. Representative Rankin cast the sole dissenting vote. This action created a furor and Rankin declined to seek reelection. After leaving office in 1943, Rankin continued to be an important spokesperson for pacifism and social reform. In 1967, she organized the Jeannette Rankin Brigade, an organization that staged a number of highly publicized protests against the Vietnam War. She died in 1973 at the age of 93.
2
Anthrax poisoning kills 62 in Russia
The world’s first anthrax epidemic begins in Ekaterinburg, Russia (now Sverdlovsk), on April 2, 1979. By the time it ended six weeks later, 62 people were dead. Another 32 survived serious illness. Ekaterinburg, as the town was known in Soviet times, also suffered livestock losses from the epidemic.

As people in Ekaterinburg first began reporting their illnesses, the Soviet government announced that the cause was tainted meat that the victims had eaten. Since the town was known in intelligence circles for its biological-weapons plant, much of the rest of the world was immediately skeptical of the Soviet explanation.

It was not until 13 years later, in 1992, that the epidemic was finally explained: workers at the Ekaterinburg weapons plant failed to replace a crucial filter, causing a release of anthrax spores into the outside air. The wind carried the spores to a farming area and infected people and livestock in the area. Had the town been downwind from the plant at the time of the release, the death toll might have been considerably higher.

Anthrax is a bacterium that can enter the body through multiple routes. It is most deadly when it is inhaled. It prompts the production of toxic molecules that destroy essential proteins in the body’s cells, usually in the lymph nodes.

In 2001, anthrax spores were used as a weapon of terror in the United States. Spores were mailed to media organizations and members of the U.S. Senate. Five people died and another 13 were infected, but survived.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by AlexO » April 4, 2021, 10:36 am

So many similarities to the China virus. But the lefty halfwits will not acknowledge it. It had to be Trumps fault.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 5, 2021, 5:07 am

1

Almonds
Rich in healthy fats, fiber and protein, these nuts are made for more than snacking. Use slivered almonds as a topping for oatmeal or yogurt, add them to muffin recipes, or use almond flour in place of regular flour

2

Apple cider vinegar
“Some people put apple cider vinegar in water and sip it throughout the day, but I hate the taste of it so I put it in a shot glass and throw it back like I’m doing a shot of tequila,” says Amy Morosini, whose health tips are featured in Secrets of the World’s Healthiest People.“Instead of sucking on a lemon afterward, I bite into a sweet piece of fruit, like a strawberry or tangerine. It’s a healthy shot everyone should do!”

Try Morosini's apple cider vinegar smoothie: Blend until smooth 1 cup ice, 1 cup baby spinach leaves, ¾ cup green grapes, ¾ cup pineapple chunks, 1 small apple, 1 small banana, ½ cup water, 1 tablespoon chia seeds, and 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar. Serves 1.

3
Coffee
Is coffee good for you? You bet: In addition to perking you up, coffee may help to drop your risk for heart diabetes, diabetes, and certain cancers. For an extra health boost, try kicking things up by adding spices to your coffee grounds before brewing. For every scoop of ground coffee add ¼ teaspoon of either ground cinnamon, cardamom, or turmeric to the filter.

4

Garlic
The active ingredient, allicin, may help to keep cholesterol levels low, protect your cells from oxidative damage, and normalize blood pressure and blood sugar. Raw, minced garlic offers the most health bang for your buck, says Dr. Bowers, co-author of Secrets of the World's Healthiest People. Add it to fresh homemade salsa, stir into ranch dressings, use minced garlic and olive oil as a topping for toast, or mash it into guac.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 6, 2021, 8:08 am

1

Vasily Mikhailovich Blokhin (Russian: Васи́лий Миха́йлович Блохи́н; 7 January 1895 – 3 February 1955) was a Soviet Russian Major-General who served as the chief executioner of the Stalinist NKVD under the administrations of Genrikh Yagoda, Nikolai Yezhov, and Lavrentiy Beria.

Hand-picked for the position by Joseph Stalin in 1926, Blokhin led a company of executioners that performed and supervised numerous mass killings during Stalin's reign, mostly during the Great Purge and World War II.[2] He is recorded as having executed tens of thousands of prisoners by his own hand, including his killing of about 7,000 Polish prisoners of war during the Katyn massacre in spring 1940,[2][3] making him the most prolific official executioner and mass murderer in recorded world history.[2][4] Forced into retirement following the death of Stalin, Blokhin died in 1955, his death being officially reported as a suicide.
Blokhin's most infamous act was the April 1940 execution by shooting of about 7,000 Polish prisoners interned in the Ostashkov prisoner of war camp in the Katyn forest. The majority were military and police officers who had been captured following the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939.[9] The event's infamy also stems from the Stalin regime's orchestration of the murders, and the subsequent Allied propaganda campaign which blamed Nazi Germany for the massacres, aided by the Western Allies in order to preserve morale.

In 1990, as part of Glasnost, Mikhail Gorbachev gave the Polish government the files on the massacres at Katyn, Starobelsk and Kalinin (now Tver), revealing Stalin's involvement.[10] Based on the 4 April secret order from Stalin to NKVD Chief Lavrentiy Beria (as well as NKVD Order № 00485, which still applied), the executions were carried out over 28 consecutive nights at the specially constructed basement execution chamber at the NKVD headquarters in Kalinin, and were assigned, by name, directly to Blokhin, making him the official executioner of the NKVD.[11]

Blokhin initially decided on an ambitious quota of 300 executions per night, and engineered an efficient system in which the prisoners were individually led to a small antechamber—which had been painted red and was known as the "Leninist room"—for a brief and cursory positive identification, before being handcuffed and led into the execution room next door. The room was specially designed with padded walls for soundproofing, a sloping concrete floor with a drain and hose, and a log wall for the prisoners to stand against. Blokhin would stand waiting behind the door in his executioner garb: a leather butcher's apron, leather hat, and shoulder-length leather gloves. Then, without a hearing, the reading of a sentence or any other formalities, each prisoner was brought in and restrained by guards while Blokhin shot him once in the base of the skull with a German Walther Model 2 .25 ACP pistol. He had brought a briefcase full of his own Walther pistols, since he did not trust the reliability of the standard-issue Soviet TT-30 for the frequent, heavy use he intended. The use of a German pocket pistol, which was commonly carried by German police and intelligence agents, also provided plausible deniability of the executions if the bodies were discovered later.

An estimated 30 local NKVD agents, guards and drivers were pressed into service to escort prisoners to the basement, confirm identification, then remove the bodies and hose down the blood after each execution. Although some of the executions were carried out by Senior Lieutenant of State Security Andrei Rubanov, Blokhin was the primary executioner and, true to his reputation, liked to work continuously and rapidly without interruption. In keeping with NKVD policy and the overall "wet" nature of the operation, the executions were conducted at night, starting at dark and continuing until just prior to dawn. The bodies were continuously loaded onto covered flat-bed trucks through a back door in the execution chamber and trucked, twice a night, to Mednoye, where Blokhin had arranged for a bulldozer and two NKVD drivers to dispose of bodies at an unfenced site. Each night, 24–25 trenches were dug, measuring 8 to 10 metres (26 to 33 ft) in length, to hold that night's corpses, and each trench was covered over before dawn.

Blokhin and his team worked without pause for 10 hours each night, with Blokhin executing an average of one prisoner every three minutes.[3] At the end of the night, Blokhin provided vodka to all his men.[17] On 27 April 1940, Blokhin secretly received the Order of the Red Banner and a modest monthly pay premium as a reward from Joseph Stalin for his "skill and organization in the effective carrying out of special tasks". His tally of 7,000 shot in 28 days remains the most organized and protracted mass murder by a single individual on record, and caused him being named the Guinness World Record holder for 'Most Prolific Executioner' in 2010.

2

Pretzels
This one really hurts."Pretzels are basically made out of sugar," says Cara Walsh, R.D., of Medifast Weight Control Centers of California."The refined-carb product contains no nutrients that are beneficial for health and aren't satisfying, hence why so many people tend to overeat them."



3


Beef jerky
Sure, this delish snack conveniently gives you access to protein on the run, but most jerkies are chock-full of sodium to preserve the meat."The increased sodium intake can cause water retention and bloating," says Rebecca Lewis, R.D., in-house dietitian at HelloFresh. Lewis recommends opting for low-sodium turkey jerky instead."It's just as delicious without all the salt," she says.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 7, 2021, 6:40 am

1

Apple pie: UK vs. USA
The saying ‘American as apple pie’ – commonly used to describe someone or something typically American – seems to suggest this comforting, classic dessert was invented in the US. But it was a 1924 ad for suits that first used the phrase. And even the apples sliced into the pie originate from elsewhere, being native to Asia. The first written reference to apple pie was in 1381 in England.

2
Diet sodas
Sure, swapping full-fledged sodas for the diet stuff saves calories and sugar. But“zero calories doesn't mean zero impact on your body,” says Christy Brissette, R.D., president of 80 Twenty Nutrition.

Sugar substitutes can cause bloating and gas, and some research has even found that drinking diet sodas might promote overeating and lead to weight gain, as well as increase your risk of osteoporosis and possibly even type 2 diabetes.

The recipe, by The Canterbury Tales author Geoffrey Chaucer, called for a pastry crust packed with apples, pears, figs and raisins – but not even a teaspoon of sugar. Whether you prefer your pie à la mode (with ice-cream), topped with a thick dollop of clotted cream or in a cardboard sleeve, from McDonald's, is another matter entirely.

3

Chicken tikka masala: UK vs. India
This creamy, mildly spiced chicken curry is widely considered to be Britain’s national dish. And it’s also claimed it was invented in the UK – at a restaurant in Glasgow, to be precise. In 1970 Ali Ahmed Aslam, of Glasgow’s Shish Mahal curry house, apparently emptied a can of tomato soup over a chicken tikka dish a customer complained was “too dry”.
He stirred in yogurt and some extra spices, and a British icon was born. It isn’t that simple, though, of course. There are counter-claims that the origins of chicken tikka masala lie in India where, under the British Empire, sauce was added to dry, fiery curries to suit palates unaccustomed to spice. Another theory is that it’s a take on butter chicken, a traditional Punjabi recipe.

4

Cornish pasty: Devon vs. Cornwall, UK
These two southwestern counties have a habit of falling out over food, and the humble Cornish pasty has really stirred up conflict over the years. Yes, it’s called a Cornish pasty, and the story goes that these meat-and-veg pastry pockets were popularised in the 17th and 18th centuries as a handheld meal miners could easily take to work.
But other evidence has thrown their origins – and potentially the name – into doubt. Dr Todd Gray, an academic at Exeter University, claimed a document describes the making of pasties in Devon 236 years before a written account of pasties in Cornwall. A Cornish counter-claim argued that cave drawings suggest pasties existed in that county in primitive times.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 8, 2021, 1:12 am

1

Mount Washington’s snow-capped summit beckons climbers and hikers alike. Towering over all in spectacular New Hampshire, this is a popular spot for outdoor adventurers. But make no mistake about it.

Those who underestimate the highest peak in the northeastern United States risk paying the ultimate price. Mount Washington is accessible, but that doesn’t mean it’s suitable for the inexperienced. The weather conditions are erratic here and countless hazards await.

Year-round snowfall can make navigation a constant challenge. But it’s the high winds that swirl around the summit that make Mount Washington so dangerous. The highest wind velocity ever recorded, some 231mph, was here, in 1934, and severe weather continues to prove perilous.

Those unprepared risk being blown off course and getting lost or worse. Unstable snow formations mean avalanches are always a real risk, and more than 150 fatalities have been recorded on Mount Washington’s ever-dangerous slopes. Thinking about taking a hike in New Hampshire? Please do take care.

2
Band of Brothers
Herbert M. Sobel Sr. (26 January 1912 – 30 September 1987) was an American commissioned officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division during World War II. Sobel was portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers by David Schwimmer.
Sobel enlisted in the Army on 7 March 1941 and volunteered for the paratroopers. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant. Promoted to first lieutenant, Sobel commanded Company E for all of their basic training at Camp Toccoa, Georgia. He trained his men intensely, and was eventually promoted to the rank of captain in recognition of his ability as a trainer. However, Sobel was despised by his soldiers for being petty and vindictive.

After a period of training in the United Kingdom before the Normandy invasion, Captain Sobel was reassigned from command of Easy Company to command the jump school at Chilton Foliat. First Lieutenant Thomas Meehan replaced Sobel, and was one of several officers (including Richard Winters) to succeed him in that post before the end of the war.

Sobel jumped into Normandy and earned a Combat Infantryman Badge as part of Regimental Headquarters Company.

Sobel was assigned as the regimental S-4 (logistics) officer on 8 March 1945.

Sobel returned to the United States in 1945, and was honorably discharged from the Army on 18 March 1946. He worked as an accountant before being recalled to active duty during the Korean War.[9] He remained in the Army National Guard, eventually retiring at the rank of lieutenant colonel. needed] He later married and had three children.

In 1970, Sobel shot himself in the head with a small-caliber pistol in an attempted suicide.[11] The bullet entered his left temple, passed behind his eyes, and exited the other side of his head. This severed his optic nerves and left him blind.[11] Soon afterward, he began living at a VA assisted-living facility in Waukegan, Illinois. He died there of malnutrition on 30 September 1987.[11][12] No memorial services were held for him.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 9, 2021, 8:02 am

1
Project Habakkuk
Project Habakkuk was Britain’s secret plan to construct an ice warship during World War II which they intended to use against the deadly German U-boats. The aircraft carrier would be made of ice and wood because at the time, aluminum and steel were both in short supply. Besides, they believed using ice would make the ship unsinkable and indestructible.

It was Geoffrey Pyke who conceived the rather crazy idea but British prime minister Winston Churchill gave his approval. In the course of four months, a prototype was built and then tested. During construction, however, they came across several problems and later on, the project was abandoned.
2
Flight Sergeant Avis Hearn MM. In 1940, during the Battle of Britain, ACW (Aircraftwoman) Hearn worked at R.A.F. Poling radar station near Arundel, West Sussex. Poling was one of the vital chain radar stations on the south coast responsible for plotting enemy formations crossing the Channel.
In the early afternoon of 18 August 1940, remembered as “The Hardest Day”, ACW Hearn received a call warning of an imminent attack on Poling. Shortly afterwards, 31 Ju 87s of III./StG 77 began to scream down intent on destroying the station.
The recommendation for her Military Medal stated “During an enemy air attack on Poling A.M.E Station, 87 bombs were dropped in or around the Receiver end of the Compound and concentrated round the Receiver Hut and ‘R” Block, doing considerate damage. In “R” Block, every door and window was blown in and one of the main walls between the RF6 and Calculator Rooms was badly cracked. Several heavy bombs of 500lb fell alongside the “R’ Block. Alone in the block was ACW Hearn controlling telephones. Throughout the attack, ACW Hearn remained at her post in a building which threatened to collapse about her, doing her work as far as she was able over the terrific noise.”
It was for this act of bravery that she was awarded the Military Medal. One of only six Military Medals awarded to WAAFs during WW2. Her Air Commodore noted that she had displayed “courage and devotion to duty of the highest order”. She received her medal from individual George VI at Buckingham Palace and was described by the press as “4’11” of courage”.
ACW Hearn was later promoted to Flight Sergeant and instructed radio operators at a training school in Technical Training Command.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 10, 2021, 6:54 am

1

The Flying Nightingales
The first WAAF nursing orderlies selected to fly on air-ambulance duties to France, standing in front of a Douglas Dakota Mark III of No. 233 Squadron RAF at B2/Bazenville, Normandy. June, 1944.
Leading Aircraftwoman Myra Roberts of Oswestry, Corporal Lydia Alford of Eastleigh and Leading Aircraftwoman Edna Birbeck of Wellingborough.
Nursing Orderlies of the WAAF flew on RAF transport planes to evacuate the wounded from the Normandy battlefields. They were dubbed Flying Nightingales by the press. The RAF Air Ambulance Unit flew under 46 Group Transport Command from RAF Down Ampney, RAF Broadwell, and RAF Blakehill Farm. RAF Dakota aircraft carried military supplies and ammunition so could not display the Red Cross.
Training for air ambulance nursing duties included instruction in the use of oxygen, injections, learning how to deal with certain types of injuries such as broken bones, missing limb cases, head injuries, burns and colostomies; and to learn the effects of air travel and altitude.

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Franciszka Manheimer-Rosenberg (4 February 1917 – 23 October 1943), better known as Franceska Mann, was a Polish Jewish ballerina who according to some accounts had killed a Nazi guard while a prisoner at the Auschwitz concentration camp, Josef Schillinger, and wounded at least one other, Wilhelm Emmerich [de], initiating an uprising among female Jewish prisoners before she was killed, presumably by gunfire. In the most popular version of the event, but never verified, Mann is said to have performed a striptease for members of the Nazi regime and once down to naught but high heels, took one of her shoes and stabbed Walter Quakernack in the face with the heel-piece, causing him to drop his firearm, which she then used to shoot Schillinger and Emmerich. Schillinger ultimately died from his wounds several hours later while Emmerich was left with a permanent limp. According to another account, however, she was a Nazi collaborator who was executed by the Polish underground in the Fall of 1942.

Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » April 11, 2021, 1:41 am

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Humans
Unsurprisingly, we are our own worst enemies. With nearly eight billion humans on the planet, most packed into tight quarters, we excel at harming one another. We cause more human fatalities each year than any other animal by far: 1.25 million deaths from violence and another 1.35 million deaths from road traffic incidents alone. Add to that the diseases we pass on, non-fatal injuries, and health impacts from manmade causes such as pollution, environmental degradation and disasters—well, other people are the animals we should most fear.

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Mosquitoes
Historians estimate half of all people that ever lived were killed by mosquitoes, largely due to their ability to pass on disease: parasites such as malaria and roundworms, bacteria that cause tularemia, and viruses including West Nile, Zika, Chikungunya, yellow fever and dengue. In 2018, the global death toll was estimated at 830,000. Mosquitoes’ impact on humans has been so profound it has literally changed our DNA, elevating a deadly genetic mutation that causes sickle cell anemia but confers protection against malaria.

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Helminths
Helminths are a group of parasitic worms that includes hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, flukes and tapeworms. Collectively, they are responsible for considerable illness and death around the world: more than two billion people across the globe are infected; of these, 300 million suffer moderate to severe health effects, and 150,000 lose their lives

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Snakes
Snakebites kill up to 138,000 people each year and seriously harm another 400,000. Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the UN, calls it “the biggest public health crisis you’ve never heard of.” About 200 of the world’s 600 venomous snake species are considered truly dangerous to humans. One of the deadliest is from Australia’s Inland Taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus): just one bite contains enough venom to kill 100 people.

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