Yes it really happened

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Doodoo
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 8, 2019, 2:44 pm

ANSWERS BELOW
1) What US State has only one border with another
A. Rhode Island
B. Maine
C. Washington
D. Florida


2) Whats the oldest continously inhabited city
A. Istanbul, Turkey
B. Athens, Greece
C. Jerusalem
D. Damascus, Syria

3) What is the Only State with a Mexican Moto
A. Idaho
B. California
C. Montana
D. Arizona

4) How many million scent receptors ae in a dog's nose
A. 50 million
B. 100 million
C. 150 million
D. 300 million

5) Which of these cars did James Bond NOT drive in any of his films
A. Bentley
B. Toyota
C. Acura
D. Mercury



Answers
1) Maine
2) Damascus eveidence is 9000BC
3) Montana's motto is "Oro y plata," which means "Gold and silver."
4) 300 million while a human only has 5 million
5) Bond has driven a Bentley, Toyota, and Mercury, as well as an AMC, Ford, Lincoln, Aston Martin, Lotus, and many others, according to carcovers.com. But so far, no Acura



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 10, 2019, 2:03 pm

1) Afghanistan produces 95% of world market of opium $64 Billion. Also country receives the most Aid at $6.88 Billion per year

2) Argentenia largest exporters of pears 490,000 tonnes and largest consumption of beef 65.2kg per person

3) Australia winner of most Cricket World Cups (men) 1987, 1999,2003, 2007, 2015

4) Brazil Larget citrus producer 20,682,309 tons (2007)

5) Brazil most murders 61,283 (2016)

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 11, 2019, 10:59 am

1) "When you come to a roadblock take a detour" Mary Kay Ash

2) Cheapest places to live in the world 3) Thailand 2) Vietnam 1) Cambodia

3) You cannot tickle yourself This is because of an area at the back of the brain called the cerebellum. The cerebellum plays a role in monitoring movements and studies have shown that it can predict sensations caused by your own movements but not by others

4) Happiest countries in the world 3) Denmark 2) Norway 1) Denmark https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Happiness_Report

5) Biggest Storm On Oct. 12, 1979, Super Typhoon Tip's central pressure dropped to 870 mb (25.69 inches Hg), the lowest sea-level pressure ever observed on Earth, Peak wind gusts reached 190 mph (306 kph) Tip's diameter of circulation spanned approximately 1,380 miles (2,220 km), setting a record for the largest storm on Earth. The storm's huge diameter was exactly the same as the distance from New York City to Dallas.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » October 11, 2019, 8:19 pm

Doodoo wrote:
October 11, 2019, 10:59 am
4) Happiest countries in the world 3) Denmark 2) Norway 1) Denmark
???

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 11, 2019, 8:21 pm

ooops

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by stattointhailand » October 11, 2019, 9:39 pm

Udon Map wrote:
October 11, 2019, 8:19 pm
Doodoo wrote:
October 11, 2019, 10:59 am
4) Happiest countries in the world 3) Denmark 2) Norway 1) Denmark
???
Biggest sales of McD's Happy meals?

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 12, 2019, 4:19 pm

1) Gatling Gun
Developed in 1861 by Richard Gatling based on his seed planter, the Gatling Gun was the first weapon of mass destruction. Union forces employed the gun during the civil war, but the hand-cranked version soon became obsolete and was replaced with an electric motor.

With that development, the gun could fire at an impressive rate of 3,000 rounds per minute.

2) Push Lawn Mower
A British engineer, Edwin Budding, devised a new apparatus for cutting grass based on a carpet cutter in 1830. It was 19-inches wide and the frame was constructed from wrought iron. It would take a decade to develop a lawnmower meant to be operated by animals, and 60 years for the world to see the first steam-engine version.

In the United States, turf grass is one of the most common vegetation’s grown and it actually takes a very large portion of land in the entire country. After World War II, the rise of suburbia created massive demands for lawnmowers. Prior to 1946 alone, there were around 140,000 lawnmower units sold in the U.S. Currently, more than five million units are sold every year.

3) Tape Measure
Credit for the invention of the modern spring-loaded tape measure goes to Alvin Fellows. He invented it in 1868 — his method was to encase the tool in a plastic container and attach it with a spring clip. Despite its superiority to the more common wooden ruler, the tape measure didn’t start to outsell its inferior counterpart until the 1940s. Spring-loaded tape measures have a timeless design. It’s effective, inexpensive, practical, and easy to use.

4) Crossword Puzzle
The December 21st edition of the New York World in 1913 published a game that incorporated many features of modern days’ crossword puzzle; it was called the “word-cross” puzzle. The man credited for the publication is Arthur Wayne, a journalist from Liverpool, England. It is often cited as the first true crossword puzzle.

5) Velcro
A lot of people attributed the invention of Velcro to NASA, and they couldn’t be further from the truth. While NASA did popularize the fabric, it was George de Mestral who patented it in 1955. At first, Velcro was subject to all sorts of ridicules, but eventually, de Mestral had the last laugh. In the 1960s, astronauts used Velcro to secure devices for easy retrieval.

Made of two thin strips of fabric, one has countless tiny loops, and another is fitted with tiny hooks. Velcro is a truly easy to use universal fastener for all people, from DIY enthusiasts to engineers.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 13, 2019, 2:55 pm

1) Shortest Player in NBA
Muggsy Bouges at 5 foot 3 inches
Washington Bullets (1987–1988)
Charlotte Hornets (1988–1997)
Golden State Warriors (1997–1999)
Toronto Raptors (1999–2001)

2) Detroits I-375 (interstate) is a whooping 1.06 miles in length

3) Longest marriage: The world’s record for the longest marriage goes to Herbert and Zelmyra Fisher, who were married 86 years, 9 months, and 16 days as of February 27, 2011. Sadly, that is when Herbert passed away; he was 106 years old. The couple had five children.

4) George Frederick Blanda (September 17, 1927 – September 27, 2010) was an American football quarterback and placekicker who played professionally in the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL). Blanda played 26 seasons of professional football, the most in the sport's history, and had scored more points than anyone in history at the time of his retirement. Blanda retired from pro football in 1976 as the oldest player to ever play at the age of 48. He was one of only two players to play in four different decades (John Carney, who played 1988–2010, is the other), and he holds the record for most extra points made (943) and attempted (959).[1] During his career, he played under head coaches Bear Bryant, George Halas, and John Madden.

5) The oldest continuously operating cinema theatre is the Washington Iowa State Theatre (USA) in Washington, Iowa, USA, which opened on 14 May 1897, and as of 26 April 2016 has been in continuous operation for 118 years, 348 days.

The first moving picture shown at the Washington Iowa State Theatre was shown on a cinematographe that was made in Paris, France. Tickets for the first moving picture were 15, 25 and 35 US cents each.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 14, 2019, 7:16 am

1) Ages of the Founding Fathers USA
Marquis de Lafayette, 18
James Monroe, 18
Gilbert Stuart, 20
Aaron Burr, 20
Alexander Hamilton, 21
Betsy Ross, 24
James Madison, 25
Thomas Jefferson, 33
John Adams, 40
Paul Revere, 41
George Washington, 44
Samuel Adams, 53

2) Life Expectancy
Least Swaziland age 49
Highest Hong Kong 84

3) Biggest Dog in the world
Biggest Dog: Cloe – 365 lbs, 3′ 2″ tall. Tallest Dog: Zeus – 155 lbs, 3′ 8″ tall. What is the biggest dog in the world? If you’re talking about weight then the biggest dog is a Mastiff named Cloe who weighed 365 pounds and was 3 feet 2 inches tall and 8 feet 5 inches long! Cloe lived in Tibet in the 80’s.

4) According to Ocean Link and several other fish-fact sites, the Whale Shark, or Rhincodon typus, holds the title of largest fish ever caught. In 1919, a specimen measuring 59 feet was captured in the Gulf of Thailand. Not coincidentally, the Whale Shark is considered the largest species of fish, as adults often grow to be 45 feet long and can weigh up to 15 tons.
Whale Sharks are not related to whales (which are mammals, not fish). They may have earned the name because of their large size and the fact that, like whales, Whale Sharks are filter feeders. They suck up plankton and small sea creatures as they swim with their mouths open. Despite having thousands of teeth, this type of shark is harmless to humans.

5) If we wanted to just make a list of the biggest residences in the world, it would be full of palaces. The Sultan of Brunei’s 2,152,782-square-foot, (199999.992 Square Meters) marble-laden palace would be at the top of the list. The palace contains 1,788 rooms, which includes 257 bathrooms, a banquet hall that can be expanded to accommodate up to 5,000 guests, a mosque accommodating 1,500 people. The palace also includes a 110-car garage, an air conditioned stable for the Sultan's 200 polo ponies, and 5 swimming pools. Istana Nurul Iman has 564 chandeliers, 51,000 light bulbs, 44 stairwells and 18 elevators.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 15, 2019, 6:08 am

1) THANKSGIVING
In Canada According to some historians, the first celebration of Thanksgiving in North America occurred during the 1578 voyage of Martin Frobisher from England in search of the Northwest Passage.
In The US The modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition is traced to a well-recorded 1619 event in Virginia and a sparsely documented 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts.

2) Every Thanksgiving, the current U.S. president pardons a turkey.

3) Americans eat over 280 million turkeys every Thanksgiving.

4) Turducken is fast becoming a popular alternative to turkey on Thanksgiving, as it gives you the best of three worlds, turkey, duck, and chicken all baked together. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turducken

5) Canadians consumed 145.5 million kg of turkey in 2010, with 3.1 million whole turkeys purchased last year for Thanksgiving. This was about 30 per cent of all whole turkeys sold during the year according to the Turkey Farmers of Canada.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 17, 2019, 12:58 pm

1)Rasmusen poll
According to a Rasmussen poll conducted in 2007, six presidents—George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy—were rated favorably by at least 80% of Americans.

2) Ranking of British PMs by BBC 4
Winston Churchill (Con)
David Lloyd George (Lib)
Clement Attlee (Lab)
H. H. Asquith (Lib)
Margaret Thatcher (Con)

3) The Largest Excavator - Terex RH 400
The Terex RH400 - the worlds largest hydraulic shovel - weighs 1078 Tons with a shovel capacity of 94 tons in a single scoop. The RH400 has the working ability to scoop up around 9900 tons of material ever hour which is a world record for a vehicle of this type.
The Terex RH400 price tag is 11 Million Dollars.

4) individual Fahd International Airport - Dammam, Saudi Arabia (77,600 hectares)
individual Fahd International Airport (KFIA) in Dammam, Saudi Arabia is the largest airport in the world covering an area of 78,000 hectares. The design of the airport began in 1976 and was created by Yamsaki & Associates architects together with Aerosystems International. The construction began in 1983 and was completed in 1999 when commercial operations began.
The airport has a massive 6 story passenger terminal out of which three are for passenger processing, one for arrivals, one for departure, and one for boarding. The passenger terminal covers an area of 3,520,000 square feet and it is equipped with many customer counters, including 66 reserved for Saudi airlines and 44 for foreign airlines. The remainder of the counters are reserved for immigration and customs. The airport has a mosque built on the rooftop of the car park and has architectural designs that fuse modern style with old Islamic styles, and can accommodate 2,000 worshippers. The airport also has the royal terminal that is reserved for the royal family, senior government officials, and other foreign officials. The royal terminal covers an area of 177,000 square feet.

5) Largest ball of sisal twine built by a community
In Cawker City, Kansas, Frank Stoeber created a ball that had 1.6 million feet (490,000 m) of twine and 11-foot-diameter (3.4 m) when he died in 1974. Cawker City built an open-air gazebo over Stoeber's ball where every August a "Twine-a-thon" is held and more twine is added to the ball. By 2006, the twine ball had reached 17,886 pounds (8,111 kg, 8.9 US tons), a circumference of 40 feet (12 m), and a length of 7,801,766 feet (2,377.978 km; 1,477.6072 mi).[2][3] In 2013, its weight was estimated at 19,973 pounds. In August 2014, the ball measures 41.42 feet (12.62 m) in circumference, 8.06 feet (2.46 m) in diameter and 10.83 feet (3.30 m) in height, and is still growing.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » October 17, 2019, 2:11 pm

Doodoo wrote:
October 17, 2019, 12:58 pm
5) Largest ball of sisal twine built by a community
In Cawker City, Kansas, Frank Stoeber created a ball that had 1.6 million feet (490,000 m) of twine and 11-foot-diameter (3.4 m) when he died in 1974. Cawker City built an open-air gazebo over Stoeber's ball where every August a "Twine-a-thon" is held and more twine is added to the ball. By 2006, the twine ball had reached 17,886 pounds (8,111 kg, 8.9 US tons), a circumference of 40 feet (12 m), and a length of 7,801,766 feet (2,377.978 km; 1,477.6072 mi).[2][3] In 2013, its weight was estimated at 19,973 pounds. In August 2014, the ball measures 41.42 feet (12.62 m) in circumference, 8.06 feet (2.46 m) in diameter and 10.83 feet (3.30 m) in height, and is still growing.
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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 17, 2019, 2:13 pm

Why?, one may ask
Answer is "Because we can"

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 18, 2019, 3:06 pm

1) The FDA once banned sliced bread
The first loaf of machine-sliced bread was sold in 1928. Americans were still getting used to this amazing modern convenience when suddenly, 1943, the FDA banned sliced bread. The reason was because pre-sliced bread used up too much plastic packaging—plastic that could be used in the war effort. However noble the reason, people were furious and the ban only lasted three months.

2) Saudi Arabia has to buy sand and camels from Australia
When you think of Saudi Arabia, two of the first images that likely pop into your head are vast deserts of sand and lines of camels. It may sound like a case of selling ice to Eskimos but ever since 2002 the middle eastern country has been importing both sand and camels from Australia as their own supplies have run short. Australia has the largest population of wild camels in the world and its 'garnet sand' is highly prized in manufacturing.

3) The modern keyboard was designed to make people type slower
The QWERTY keyboard that we all use today was invented by Christopher Shoals in 1874 for a new typewriter. Unfortunately, the keys were prone to jamming so, as the story goes, Shoals designed the keyboard to slow typists down by placing the most commonly used letters far apart. This may be a myth—other sources say the letter placement may be based on telegraph protocol—but at least it makes you feel like your hunt-n-peck typing isn't your fault!

4) A war was started by a soccer game
In 1969, the soccer teams of Honduras and El Salvador were competing for a spot in the 1970 World Cup. Tensions mounted as the teams were tied 1-1 and went into a third match. When El Salvador won the play-off, riots erupted. The riots boiled over into a full-scale war with over 2,000 casualties on each side. After four days of fighting, the 100 Hour War was ended.

5) Falling coconuts kill more people than sharks
Sharks have a bad reputation for being merciless killers but when it comes to sheer numbers they could learn something from the humble coconut. Falling coconuts kill 150 people worldwide each year while sharks only kill about ten.

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 19, 2019, 9:15 am

1) Weird College
Deep Springs CollegeBig Pine, CA
The Curriculum: Deep Springs combines hard labor, courses cultivated by students and their teachers, and instills self-governance in a grueling two years of study.

The campus lies on a cattle ranch and alfalfa farm in the middle of the desert where students are expected to earn their free tuition by working the land in various capacities.

There’s no Facebook, no nearby emergency services, and, until 2013 (96 years after its establishment), there were no female students either.

After Graduation: You can be a chump and take the associate’s degree, or you can transfer to any top­-tier school in the country. Alumni include senators, scientists, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Admission Rate: 6—15%
2) Fastest baseball ever thrown
Nolan Ryan with a 108.1 MPH reading according to the doppler laser radar readings that were used in 1974.
3) When it opened in 2005, Kingda Ka was the world's fastest (at 128 mph) and tallest roller coaster. It doesn't come close to the record for the world's longest coaster ride. In fact, at 50.6 seconds it may be one of the shortest.

4) Andy Roddick currently holds the record for the fastest tennis serve at 155 MPH.

5) Before becoming a full-time pro wrestler, what was George Steele's profession?
A Teacher

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 20, 2019, 9:48 am

1) (USA Statistics) Of all the salt used in one year, 43% is used to deice the roadways, the biggest user of the substance 17 to 20 Million Tons per year for roads

2) Largest Ranch
Anna Creek Station has an area of 23,677 square kilometres (9,142 sq mi; 5,851,000 acres)[3] which is slightly larger than Israel. It is 1,977,000 acres (8,000 km2; 3,089 sq mi) larger than its nearest rival, Alexandria Station in the country's Northern Territory. It is over seven times the size of the United States' biggest ranch, individual Ranch in Texas, which is 825,000 acres (3,340 km2; 1,289 sq mi).


3) The longest bridge in Thailand is in Phattalung (changwat), it is over the swamp between "Talay Noi" and "Talay Sap" and is 5.5 km long.

4) Thailand Top Imports

The following product groups represent the highest dollar value in Thailand’s import purchases during 2018. Also shown is the percentage share each product category represents in terms of overall imports into Thailand.

Electrical machinery, equipment: US$45.6 billion (18.2% of total imports)
Mineral fuels including oil: $42.7 billion (17%)
Machinery including computers: $29.6 billion (11.8%)
Gems, precious metals: $15.9 billion (6.4%)
Iron, steel: $12.5 billion (5%)
Vehicles: $10.2 billion (4.1%)
Plastics, plastic articles: $9.6 billion (3.8%)
Articles of iron or steel: $7.5 billion (3%)
Optical, technical, medical apparatus: $6 billion (2.4%)
Organic chemicals: $5 billion (2%)

5) Thailand Top Exports
The following export product groups represent the highest dollar value in Thai global shipments during 2018. Also shown is the percentage share each export category represents in terms of overall exports from Thailand.
Machinery including computers: US$42.9 billion (17.2% of total exports)
Electrical machinery, equipment: $35 billion (14%)
Vehicles: $30.4 billion (12.2%)
Rubber, rubber articles: $15.5 billion (6.2%)
Plastics, plastic articles: $14.5 billion (5.8%)
Gems, precious metals: $11.9 billion (4.8%)
Mineral fuels including oil: $10.6 billion (4.2%)
Meat/seafood preparations: $6.6 billion (2.6%)
Organic chemicals: $6.1 billion (2.5%)
Cereals: $5.7 billion (2.3%)

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by jackspratt » October 20, 2019, 10:44 am

Hmmm......... ranches in Australia?

Don't think so.

But there are some bloody big cattle stations. =D>

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by stattointhailand » October 20, 2019, 2:37 pm

2) Largest Ranch
Anna Creek Station has an area of 23,677 square kilometres (9,142 sq mi; 5,851,000 acres)[3] which is slightly larger than Israel. It is 1,977,000 acres (8,000 km2; 3,089 sq mi) larger than its nearest rival, Alexandria Station in the country's Northern Territory. It is over seven times the size of the United States' biggest ranch, individual Ranch in Texas, which is 825,000 acres (3,340 km2; 1,289 sq mi).

Just think, a bit of common sense in 1948 and we could have located Israel at Anna Creek Station, they would have had extra land so no need to keep stealing it, the Palastinians could have had their country back and everything would be "sweet as a nut" in the Middle East :-k

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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Barney » October 20, 2019, 4:29 pm

Just think a bit of common sense if England had annexed 20% of their country and given it to the Jews then Palestine could have got their land back and bobs your uncle.
But the British colonialists would never give their own land.

I have read that China has the biggest farm. Maybe not cattle and sheep but good crop grounds.



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Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 21, 2019, 6:02 am

1) Biggest Layoff
IBM: 60,000 jobs lost
The most tragic entry has to be the International Business Machines Corporation. In July 1993, IBM, one of the leaders in the IT industry, announced a massive layoff plan. The company was suffering from industry changes brought on by the arrival of the personal computer. While IBM specialized in networks, up-and-coming giants like Microsoft and Intel were becoming more attractive to investors.


2) Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, also known as the Ringling Bros. Circus, Ringling Bros. or simply Ringling was an American traveling circus company billed as The Greatest Show on Earth. It and its predecessor shows ran from 1871 to 2017. Known as Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Combined Shows, the circus started in 1919 when the Barnum & Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth, a circus created by P. T. Barnum and James Anthony Bailey, was merged with the Ringling Bros. World's Greatest Shows. The Ringling brothers had purchased Barnum & Bailey Ltd. following Bailey's death in 1906, but ran the circuses separately until they were merged in 1919.
With weakening attendance, many animal rights protests, and high operating costs, the circus performed its final show on May 21, 2017, at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum and closed after 146 years.

3) Harrods
The store occupies a 5-acre (20,000 m2) site and has 330 departments covering 1.1 million square feet (102,193.344 m2) of retail space. It is the largest department store in Europe and lays claim to having its own unique postcode, SW1X 7XL.

The Harrods motto is Omnia Omnibus Ubique, which is Latin for "all things for all people, everywhere".[6] Several of its departments, including the seasonal Christmas department and the food halls, are well known.
1824: Charles Henry Harrod starts his first business as a draper, at 228, Borough High Street, Southwark, London.
Now owned by the Qatar Investment Fund

4) Oldest MLB Park
Fenway Park is a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts near Kenmore Square. Since 1912, it has been the home for the Boston Red Sox, the city's American League baseball team, and since 1953, its only Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. It is the oldest ballpark in MLB.[9] Because of its age and constrained location in Boston's dense Fenway–Kenmore neighborhood, the park has been renovated or expanded many times, resulting in quirky features including "The Triangle," Pesky's Pole, and the Green Monster in left field. It is the fourth-smallest among MLB ballparks by seating capacity, second-smallest by total capacity, and one of eight that cannot accommodate at least 40,000 spectators.

5) Golf
On the 13th hole at the 1938 PGA tournament, Jimmy Hines's chip shot hit opponent Sam Snead's ball, sending both into the cup. A birdie two was awarded to both players, who were tied at that point. Snead wound up beating Hines by one stroke.

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