Yes it really happened

Post your thoughts here if you are not sure where to post it!
Post Reply
Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 31, 2019, 3:43 pm

1) Among other outrageously poor money decisions too numerous to reveal here, Mike Tyson once dropped an estimated $2.2 million on a 24 karat gold bathtub for his mansion in Ohio.

2) In Arizona ... it's illegal for a donkey to sleep in a bathtub.
In the 1920's, a local dam broke, flooding a rancher's home. The rancher's donkey had become accustomed to sleeping in the bathtub, which filled with water and whisked him miles away. After working to rescue the animal, the town passed this law, which is still in place today.

3) In seven U.S. states, according to their constitutions, atheists are barred from holding public office.

4) In Maryland ... sleeveless shirts are banned in public.
Outlawed in Baltimore in 1898, this law applies to everyone (even runners!). The only exception: The "vagrants" who are allowed to visit the zoo while wearing sleeveless tops. It's about time, those muscle tees have to go!

5) In Michigan ... don't even think about selling your vehicle on a Sunday.
It is unlawful to sell, trade or buy motor vehicles on a Sunday in Michigan due to religious reasons. According to the Wolverine State, time is better spent with family, friends or at church.



User avatar
Udon Map
Admin
Posts: 1573
Joined: July 31, 2013, 7:57 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » October 31, 2019, 4:09 pm

Doodoo wrote:
October 31, 2019, 3:43 pm
1) Among other outrageously poor money decisions too numerous to reveal here, Mike Tyson once dropped an estimated $2.2 million on a 24 karat gold bathtub for his mansion in Ohio.
And interestingly, the house has been acquired by The Living Word Sanctuary Church and is in the process of being converted into the church's new home.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » October 31, 2019, 4:26 pm

Not paying Property tax and making donations tax deductible certainly does help.
The Living Word Sanctuary Church is a 140 member organization
Once again I was in the wrong business

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 1, 2019, 5:59 am

1) Longest professional baseball game
The Pawtucket Red Sox and the Rochester Red Wings, two teams from the Triple-A International League, played the longest game in professional baseball history. It lasted 33 innings, with 8 hours and 25 minutes of playing time. 32 innings were played April 18/19, 1981, at McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket, Rhode Island and the final 33rd inning was played June 23, 1981. Pawtucket won the game, 3–2.

2) Shortest MLB game
what is the fastest nine-inning in MLB history?
That would be the Sept. 28, 1919, game between the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies in the Polo Grounds. Behind pitcher Jesse Barnes, the Giants won 6-1. Barnes threw a complete game, striking out two and walking none. Phillies pitcher Lee Meadows also threw a complete game and took the loss. George "High Pockets" Kelly had three hits for the Giants and scored once.
Time of the game: 51 minutes.

3) Shortest Player in MLB
Edward Carl Gaedel (June 8, 1925 – June 18, 1961) was the smallest player to appear in a Major League Baseball game.

Gaedel (some sources say the family name may actually have been Gaedele, which is the name seen on his gravestone) gained recognition in the second game of a St. Louis Browns doubleheader on August 19, 1951. Weighing 65 pounds (29 kg) and standing 3 feet 7 inches (109 cm) tall, he became the shortest player in the history of the Major Leagues. Gaedel made a single plate appearance and was walked with four consecutive balls before being replaced by a pinch-runner at first base. His jersey, bearing the uniform number "​1⁄8", is displayed in the St. Louis Cardinals Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

4) The tallest moose on record is a male Alaskan moose that was first discovered in 1897, as it stood 7 feet and 8 inches at the shoulders and weighed 1,819 pounds. This moose had antlers that spread approximately 79 inches.

5) Clyde, a Kodiak brown bear, weighed 2,130 pounds at the time of his death in 1987 at the Dakota Zoo in Bismarck, N.D. He was 22. A year prior to his death, zookeepers estimated his weight was close to 2,400.
Kodiak bears and grizzlies are subspecies of brown bears. A large male Kodiak is approximately 10 feet upright and 5 feet on all fours. They can run at 30mph

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 2, 2019, 11:13 am

1) The most expensive shoes
It took Nike about 27 years to make an auto-lacing shoe like the pair that Marty McFly wore in Back to the Future. Since only 100 pairs were made, they sell for over $28,000.

2) Least populated State Wyoming 450,000

3) The Most Expensive Watch
Graff Diamonds Hallucination | $55 Million
The title of the most expensive watch in the world goes to Graff Diamonds for the incredible, Hallucination. Worth a whopping $55 million, the Hallucination is a masterpiece with over 110 carats of coloured diamonds set into a bracelet of platinum.
I will stick with my $45 Timex

4) Most expensive car in the world
Car Rolls Royce Sweptails 2017 6.75 L V12 453 hp 150 mph $13 million

5) Most expensive price per square foot for homes
Monaco $4500USD per square foot
Hong Kong $3000USD per square foot

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 3, 2019, 1:58 pm

1) Record High Temp Udonthani 43C April
Record Low Temp get the woolies out 4.2C December

2) Elephants Thailand
Although there were 100,000 domesticated elephants in Thailand in 1850, the population of elephants has dropped to an estimated 2,000. Poachers have long hunted elephants for ivory and hides, and now increasingly for meat. Young elephants are often captured for use in tourist attractions or as work animals, although their use has declined since the government banned logging in 1989. There are now more elephants in captivity than in the wild, and environmental activists claim that elephants in captivity are often mistreated.

3) Population Udonthani City
131,192 (According to Wikipedia)

4) Canada is the biggest exporter of Blueberries

5) Largest Producers of Gold
China 400 metric tons, Australia 310 metric tons, Russia 295 metric tons

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 4, 2019, 6:01 am

1) Largest Tank Battle
The Battle of Kursk was a Second World War
The Battle of Kursk began July 5, 1943 and lasted more than a month. The German surprise assault and subsequent Soviet counterattack involved some 6,000 tanks and 2 million troops.

2) The smallest bone in the human body is the stirrup bone, the stapes, one of the 3 bones that make up your middle ear; measuring 2-3 millimeters. It shaped like a “U” and is the innermost bone that receives sound vibrations and passes them along to the cochlea to eventually be interpreted by the brain.

3) The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the world's five ocean basins. With an area of about 6.1 million square miles, the Arctic Ocean is about 1.5 times as big as the United States. It is bordered by Greenland, Canada, Norway, Alaska, and Russia. The average depth of the Arctic Ocean is 3,953 feet and it is 18,264 feet at its deepest point.

4) 9343 personnel lost Wilhelm Gustloff – The German KdF flagship sank after being hit by three torpedoes fired by the Soviet submarine S-13 on 30 January 1945 in the Baltic. 5,348 are known dead but it has been estimated that up to 9,343 were killed, making it possibly the worst single-ship loss of life in history. Most of those killed were German civilians, military personnel, and Nazi officials being evacuated from East Prussia. 996 survivors were rescued.

5) The origin of the Fruit of the Loom company dates back to 1851 in Rhode Island,[5][6] when textile mill owner Robert Knight and his brother Benjamin established the "B.B. and R. Knight Corporation" after they acquired the Pontiac Mill in Warwick, Rhode Island. In 1856, the company changed its name to "Fruit of the Loom", while producing its first muslins.

Muslin
Muslin (/ˈmʌzlɪn/ or /ˈmjuːslɪn/[citation needed]), also mousseline or Malmal, is a cotton fabric of plain weave...

A friend of Robert Knight named Rufus Skeel owned a small shop in Providence that sold cloth from Knight's mill. Skeel's daughter painted images of apples and applied them to the bolts of cloth. The ones with the apple emblems proved most popular. Knight thought the labels would be the perfect symbol for his trade name, Fruit of the Loom – an expression referring to clothes, paralleling the phrase "fruit of the womb" meaning "children", which can be traced back to the Bible (Psalm 127:3).

In 1871, just one year after the first trademark laws were passed by Congress, Knight received trademark number 418 for the brand "Fruit of the Loom".

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 5, 2019, 5:56 am

1) On July 31, 1790 Samuel Hopkins was issued the first patent for a process of making potash, an ingredient used in fertilizer. The patent was signed by President George Washington. Hopkins was born in Vermont, but was living in Philadelphia, Pa. when the patent was granted.

2) Food rations WW2 UK
Food rations April 1945

Bacon and ham 8 oz (227 g)
Sugar 16 oz (454 g)
Loose tea 4 oz (113 g)
Meat equivalent to £2.31 in 2016
Cheese 8 oz (227 g)
Vegetarians were allowed an extra 3 oz (85 g) cheese[29]

Preserves 1 lb (0.45 kg) per month
2 lb (0.91 kg) marmalade 8 oz (227 g) per month
1 lb (0.45 kg) sugar
Butter 8 oz (227 g)
Margarine 12 oz (340 g)
Lard 3 oz (85 g)
Sweets 16 oz (454 g) per month

3) Soap
All types of soap were rationed. Coupons were allotted by weight or (if liquid) by quantity. In 1945, the ration gave four coupons each month; babies and some workers and invalids were allowed more.[34] A coupon would yield:

4 oz (113 g) bar hard soap
3 oz (85 g) bar toilet soap
1⁄2 oz (14 g) No. 1 liquid soap
6 oz (170 g) soft soap
3 oz (85 g) soap flakes
6 oz (170 g) powdered soap
4) Rationing in the UK did not end until July 1954 9 years after the end of WW2.

5) The olny POW to escape Canda to Germany
Most of the prisoners were far younger and in better physical condition than their guards. Escapes were attempted, often as a “game” to help relieve boredom. A few prisoners succeeded in escaping for a time — but all were recaptured except one.

In January 1941, POW Franz von Werra — a celebrated German fighter pilot ace captured by the British in 1940 — jumped from a train carrying him and other POWs in Ontario. Von Werra crossed the St. Lawrence River into New York State and managed to return to Germany via Mexico and South America. Upon his return, von Werra was decorated by Hitler personally. He rejoined the Luftwaffe and died in October 1941, when his plane crashed into the North Sea off the Netherlands.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 6, 2019, 5:51 am

1) Camp X
This top-secret Second World War spy training school was unofficially known as Camp X. It was established December 6, 1941, in Whitby, Ontario through a cooperative effort between the British Security Coordination (BSC) and the Canadian government.

2) The CIA Reportedly Reads Up to Five Million Tweets Per Day
The agency might be monitoring your Facebook feed, too, according to a report by the Associated Press. Why, you ask? Agents apparently like to stay up-to-date on the public’s reactions to world events. Other surveillance methods include TVs, iPhones, Androids, and computers running Windows, macOS, and Linux.

3) You Can Read About the CIA’s Investigations of UFOs (and You!) Online
Anyone with an Internet connection can access CREST, a CIA reading room of roughly 930,000 documents. Over 12 million pages were recently declassified, and many of them shed light on the agency’s investigations into UFOs, psychics, and invisible ink. If you want to know the dirt the CIA has on you, you can request your own file, too.

4) Cup of Joe
When Josephus Daniels was appointed secretary of the U.S. Navy in 1913, he banned alcohol from military ships. Legend has it that sailors began to refer to the hardest drink available to them—coffee—as a “cup of joe.”

5) Grunt Work
During the Vietnam War, American infantrymen took to calling one another “grunts.” One likely theory says “grunt” refers to the sound a soldier made when picking up heavy combat gear; another (less likely) says it was an acronym for “general rifleman, usually not trained.” In any case, grunt work became synonymous with tedious, thankless labour.

User avatar
Udon Map
Admin
Posts: 1573
Joined: July 31, 2013, 7:57 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Udon Map » November 6, 2019, 8:13 am

Doodoo wrote:
November 6, 2019, 5:51 am
If you want to know the dirt the CIA has on you, you can request your own file, too.
Call me overly suspicious, but I can't help but think that such a request will cause the CIA to start a file on you if they don't already have one.

User avatar
stattointhailand
udonmap.com
Posts: 11409
Joined: October 25, 2007, 11:34 pm
Location: Oiling the locks on my gun case

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by stattointhailand » November 6, 2019, 7:10 pm

"The CIA Reportedly Reads Up to Five Million Tweets Per Day"

I somehow feel thats hard to believe dot dot dot dot dot it must take them most of the day to make sense of Donald Trumps tweets so there would be little time to decipher anyone elses :lol:

" Other surveillance methods include TVs, iPhones, Androids, and computers running Windows, macOS, and Linux."

which is why they dont want Huawei spying on their spying :lol:

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 7, 2019, 5:57 am

1) Zippers
Originally known as a slide fastener, the zipper wasn’t mass-produced until World War I, when the U.S. military requested them for flight suits and money belts, which were a necessity for U.S. sailors because their uniforms didn’t have pockets.

2) Soy dogs (Hot Dogs)
In 1918, in Cologne, Germany, Mayor Konrad Adenauer applied for a patent for his novel ­way of preserving meat: mixing sausage with soy flour. Although not strictly vege­tarian, the method had staying power. Soy products are now a multibillion-­dollar industry in the United States alone.

3) Modern passports
In hopes of restoring tourism throughout Europe, the League of Nations issued guidelines for uniform passports in 1920. The standard documents were to include a cover embossed with the issuing country’s name and coat of arms—the same basic look they have today in most every country, including the United States.

4) Brazil
Biggest sports #1 soccer and #2 Bull Riding
Biggest Bull Riding event held at Barretos each year with over 1.5 million in attendance over 10 days.

5) Deepest Lake in the world
Lake Baikal Russia 1642 meters deep

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 8, 2019, 9:32 am

1) How to make SLIME ( A children activity that they love and its CHEAP)
Slime is always popular with the kids and the reason is simple––because it's a lot of fun! It is cheap and easy to make at home, and can even be made by younger kids with the right care and supervision. As well as being fun, it's a tactile way to relieve stress

2) OOOPPPS
NASA has lost or misplaced more than 500 of the Moon rocks its Apollo astronauts collected and brought back to Earth, according to a new agency report.
"NASA has been experiencing loss of astromaterials since lunar samples were first returned by Apollo missions," inspector general Paul K. Martin detailed in the report. "In addition to the Mount Cuba disk, NASA confirmed that 516 other loaned astromaterials have been lost or stolen between 1970 and June 2010, including 18 lunar samples reported lost by a researcher in 2010 and 218 lunar and meteorite samples stolen from a researcher at [NASA's Johnson Space Center] in 2002, but since recovered."

3) Night lights—Lots of themThe publicly-accessible, online Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth contains photographs from space beginning with the early 1960s up to recent days. A million-plus of these images were taken from the space station, approximately 30 percent of them at night. These photographs are the highest-resolution night imagery available from orbit, thanks to a motorized tripod that compensates for the station’s speed—approximately 17,500 mph—and the motion of the Earth below. Scientists are asking for help cataloging the images through a crowd-source project called Cities at Night. It includes three components: Dark Skies of ISS, which asks people to sort images into cities, stars, and other categories (something computers aren’t good at); Night Cities, which relies on people to match the images to positions on maps; and Lost at Night, which seeks to identify cities within 310-mile-diameter images. Ultimately, the data generated could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety, and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry.

4) Want to learn about Space Station research Use this site
Space Station Research Explorer on NASA.gov

5) Chris Hadfield
The first Canadian to walk in space, Hadfield has flown two Space Shuttle missions and served as commander of the International Space Station.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 9, 2019, 6:58 am

1) The world's tallest cut Christmas tree was a 67.36 m (221 ft) Douglas fir (Pseudotsga menziesii) erected and decorated at Northgate Shopping Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, in December 1950.

2) The world's longest Christmas cracker measured 63.1 m (207 ft) long and 4 m (13 ft) in diameter and was made by the parents of children at Ley Hill School and Pre-School, Chesham, Buckinghamshire, UK on 20 December 2001.
The cracker contained balloons, toys, a hat (2.5 m (8ft) in diameter) and a joke. The cracker was pulled by children of the school and members of Saracens Rugby Club and went bang.

3) The largest Christmas stocking measured 51 m 35 cm (168 ft 5.65 in) in length and 21 m 63 cm (70 ft 11.57 in) in width (heel to toe) and was produced by the volunteer emergency services organisation Pubblica Assistenza Carrara e Sezioni (Italy) in Carrara, Tuscany, Italy, on 5 January 2011.
The event was organised in order to raise money for a charity helping the aged, one of the group’s key functions, and it was also a seasonal celebration for the city of Carrara.

Fulfilling the guideline that the stocking had to be filled with presents, the volunteers filled the stocking with balloons containing sweets inside.

4) The fastest time to decorate a Christmas tree is 34.52 sec, and was achieved by Sam Homewood (UK) on the set of Scrambled! (CITV) in Bedgbury, UK, on 12 November 2018.
Scrambled! is a TV show for children with airs on CITV in the UK on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

5) The most expensively dressed Christmas tree was valued at 41,329,531 AED ($11,026,900 US; £6,975,880), and was erected and displayed by the Emirates Palace (UAE) in Abu Dhabi, UAE, from 16 to 29 December 2010.
The tree was covered in 181 items of jewelry and stood 13.1 m (43.2 ft) high.

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 10, 2019, 9:20 am

1) Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson holds the record for the largest layered dip.
Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and his team created the largest layered dip in January 2017. Crafted in a 100-gallon fish tank, it took over five hours to craft this mega-sized tailgating classic. The dip, which weighed 540 pounds, was later donated to an organization for people who are facing homelessness.

This isn't his only record. The Rock also holds the record for most selfies taken in three minutes, at an impressive 105.

2) Vanna White is the world's most frequent clapper.
The longtime co-host for "Wheel of Fortune" has earned a unique place in the record books. Vanna White holds the record for most frequent clapper, after clapping an estimated 3,721,446 times over the course of the show's 32 seasons.

3) Betty White's long-lasting career earned her a Guinness World Record.
The record for the female entertainer with the longest TV career goes to Betty White. With a career that began in 1939, White has acted for over 74 years, with roles in shows such as "The Golden Girls," "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," and "The Carol Burnett Show."
THE ABSOLUTE BEST

4) However, Cristiano Ronaldo has the most Instagram followers overall.
In April 2019, soccer star Cristiano Ronaldo was declared the most followed person on Instagram, with more than 186 million followers. Prior to his reign, Selena Gomez held the title for multiple years.
186,000,000 FOLLOWERS

5) Jackie Chan holds the record for most stunts by a living actor.
The actor, producer, and stunt coordinator has held the record for most stunts by a living actor since 2012. He has appeared in more than 100 films since 172 and has sustained a number of injuries in the process, including a broken nose, broken cheekbones, and a broken skull.






S

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 11, 2019, 5:47 am

Lest We Forget November 11

1)World War 1 was the first time aircraft were used in battle.The average life expectancy of a WW1 fighter pilot was just a few weeks.

2) WW1 at Sea
5 thousand German soldiers lost their lives serving in U-Boats during WW1.

3) When war broke out the government asked for 100,000 volunteers to join the army. They got 750,000 in the very first month.

4) Between 1914 and 1918 more than 15 million men and women lost their lives as a direct result of the conflict, making it one of the deadliest wars in all of human history.

5) 140,000 Labourers from China helped dig trenches for the Allies on the Western Front.
Over the course of the war the Allies managed to produce more than 6,500 tanks.

6) Prisoners of war in Canada during WWII didn’t want to leave.
Of the 35,046 German soldiers, sailors, airmen, and potential insurgents that were incarcerated in Canada during World War II, a whopping 6,000 didn’t want to leave after the war ended in 1945, according to Canada’s military history magazine. At these Canadian camps, prisoners were given paying jobs and were able to enjoy handball, boxing, wrestling, gymnastics, tennis, skating, and more activities. There was also mutual respect and trust between the guards and the prisoners. Shockingly, some guards would even loan prisoners their rifles to go hunting. It’s no wonder one prisoner referred to his time there as “the best thing that ever happened to me.”

Doodoo
udonmap.com
Posts: 1421
Joined: October 15, 2017, 8:47 pm

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Doodoo » November 12, 2019, 5:59 am

1) Most consume alcoholic drink in UK

Cider, that alcoholic sparkling fruit juice, has become trendy again at an astonishing rate, and is now top of the list. The market research company Mintel say more people now drink cider than lager, which had until recently been the biggest drink in the pub. It’s only one per cent ahead, at 47% of all drink sold in pubs, but it will very soon be much more. Their research showed that cider sales are up by almost half in just a year and are still rising.

Women and younger men are increasingly drawn to these drinks, and it’s the big success story of the pub business, bucking the overall trend of falling sales.

2) Belarus drinks the most alcoholic beverages per capita 17.6 Liters
Thailand 7.1 L Australia 12.2 (Why not)
Sweden 9.2 Russia 15.1
USA 9.2
Canada 10.2 (Heah its Cold Here)
UK 11.6 (??????????)

3) The LONGEST BAR
Generally considered to be the longest bar on the entire planet, according to the 1994 Edition of the Guinness World Book of Records, the world's longest permanent bar is the 405-ft 10-inch-long counter in the Beer Barrel Saloon at Put-in-Bay, South Bass Island, Ohio . It opened in 1989 and has 160 bar stools.

4) Biggest Producers of Wine
ITALY
According to statistics provided in the FAO report, Italy is the biggest wine producer in the world, with an annual wine production of 4.796 million tons of wine. Italian wine is renowned around the globe for its world-class finesse. Grapes, which are the primary ingredients in winemaking, are grown locally and the country has an ideal climate suited for grape cultivation. There are over one million vineyards located across every region of the country. The domestic wine consumption in Italy is about 42 liters per capita, a testament to the popularity of the commodity locally. The history of winemaking in Italy stretches thousands of years, as the ancient Romans practiced commercial wine-making and large-scale grape growing.

5) Greatest consumer of Wine
The United States consumes the largest volume of wine of any country, at 33 million hectoliters in 2018. At 26.8 million hectoliters, France was the second leading consumer of wine worldwide. (one hectoliter equals 100 liters)

User avatar
Stantheman
udonmap.com
Posts: 1010
Joined: February 9, 2009, 3:33 am
Location: USA (For Now)

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by Stantheman » November 12, 2019, 7:55 am

6) Possibly oldest bar, Sean's Bar – Athlone Ireland-900 AD

User avatar
stattointhailand
udonmap.com
Posts: 11409
Joined: October 25, 2007, 11:34 pm
Location: Oiling the locks on my gun case

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by stattointhailand » November 12, 2019, 8:19 am

Longest continuous bar in Europe is Tottenham Hotspurs Goal Line bar at 65 metres

Tottenhams new stadium can serve 10,000 pints a minute, which with a 62,000 capacity means that even if you are last to be served at half time you will still get almost 9 minutes to sup your beer before the second half starts

User avatar
tamada
udonmap.com
Posts: 3794
Joined: February 21, 2007, 4:03 am
Location: down two... then left

Re: Yes it really happened

Post by tamada » November 12, 2019, 8:52 am

stattointhailand wrote:
November 12, 2019, 8:19 am
Longest continuous bar in Europe is Tottenham Hotspurs Goal Line bar at 65 metres

Tottenhams new stadium can serve 10,000 pints a minute, which with a 62,000 capacity means that even if you are last to be served at half time you will still get almost 9 minutes to sup your beer before the second half starts
What happens if they actually win a game?

Post Reply

Return to “Open Forum”